An Article on short films getting sold

MichaelJames
MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast

Apparently visuals and flash over substance win out.  If you are a filmmaker or vfx artist then you might have aspirations of moving forward in the industry.  Well sometimes we worry about the script so much so, because we want to be the next Spielberg and apparently that is not what is getting people ahead at the moment.  I am not saying don't worry about scripts, I am just presenting this article which highlights a current fad of the industry. 

 

http://nofilmschool.com/2015/08/e-b-rhee-the-garden-cgi-sci-fi-short-film-sold-hollywood

 

<iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/135752184" width="500" height="264" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="">THE GARDEN</a> from <a href="https://vimeo.com/user38018757">EBR</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

 

 

 

Comments

  • StormyKnight
    StormyKnight Posts: 2,722 Ambassador

    I've seen a lot of sci-fi and horror movies recently that had little substance and all glitz. I suppose it makes sense that if you have a proof of concept with good eye candy and an original concept it would get noticed. But it's what Hollywood does with it after it gets ahold of it that's what's critical. I would rather have a good solid short than a crappy reproduction that's gone through so many re-writes and edits you can't recognize the original anymore.

    I formulate this opinion on personal experience from the music industry. I entered a bunch of songs in the Billboard Song Writing Contest years ago and a music production company approached me with a contract to put two of my songs on an album of theirs. The copyright was still mine and I was to get 5% in royalties for each song. When they finally got the album finished, three years later, I was sent a copy. What they did to the songs should be criminal. I can't stand to listen to more than 2 seconds without feeling woozy. Never got any royalties either. I suppose that's why guys like Gene Roddenberry, Stephen King and George Lucas don't want to let go and negotiate to keep a hand in their "stories" that become movies/TV shows. I'm sure there are some compromises but if it turns out looking like something other than what with you started is it really worth it? Maybe for a 6 or 7 dollar figure. ;^)

  • MichaelJames
    MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast

    The thing is, too many of us want to "raise our babies" and we take the artistic side that says no we know better then anyone.  If a movie studio wants to buy your short and rewrite it to death and let it live in the purgatory of production hell.. Let them.  Let  us not be a 1 trick pony that believes itself to be just that.

    I loved the interview with Mark Duplass, which I will include below.  He talks about making his first feature for 65k and how that sucked and almost made him quit the business.  Then he made a $1000 dollar movie... then another... then got someone who is a little know to be in his movies... and worked his way up.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=257&v=nZeWOAliA6Y

     

    The reason why Gene Roddenberry, Spielberg and Lucas and Stephen King have so much control over their most iconic properties(or did) is because they had credits to their name by the time it came down to make their "first big movie."  Hollywood execs will try to screw you based off just being untested.  If you want ultimate control over your project... make a couple projects that can be sold and get them out into the ether.  By the time Roddenberry had star trek started he was a seasoned writer and a seasoned producer.  He made money along the way and lived.  These days if you can make a movie from $1000-$15000... then it is easier to be sold and move forward.  The problem is our egos get in and want more then we have earned and our progress grinds to a halt. 

     

    If Hollywood will buy a short film that had some beautiful parts and some crap parts, then why not sell something of equal weight?  Honestly OrangePoeke, Triem and a couple other people on here could easily make a very complex, very beautiful flawed short.  If there was a team up on here... what would a 30k payday do for 30 filmmakers on here?  Give them the ability to each make their own $1000 feature.  The cavalry is not coming... but it's ok.  We could be our own cavalry if we just banded together.