Hitfilm and Pfhoe

I dont know if this is the right spot for this topic, but I wanted to know for sure about a few things! Pfhoe, how fast can you move your camera and still get a good tracking on the film. If the camera moves fast will hit film have a problem tracking it?? Also, why in the US where I live, why do we have 29.6 frames a second and Europe has the 23 or 24 frames a second?

Comments

  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Posts: 5,255 Staff
    edited August 2011
    US is 29.97, Europe is 25. Film is 24, with 23.97 being the digital video equivalent. The reasons date waaaaay back to the origins of film and video, and what the equipment was capable of handling at the time, but there isn't any really good reason for the framerates being different at this point, other than the standards have been around forever, and all the equipment that already exists needs those formats.
    As far as tracking, how fast you can move the camera will depend a lot on the camera itself. For example, if it is using a CMOS sensor, then any quick movement is going to result in severe rolling shutter, which will hinder accurate tracking drastically. Also, the framerate will be a factor, as the more frames you have, the less motion blur will exist in each frame. Similarly, the shutter speed will be a factor, as a very fast shutter speed will help keep things from blurring even during fast camera movements, and less blur means better tracking. Then, what exactly you are filming, and the amount of light in the scene, will also be factors.
    But as a general rule, if you want to track a shot, lots of light, good exposure, good contrast in the scene, fast shutter, and slow camera moves are all your friend.
  • guitar74
    guitar74 Posts: 506

    US is 29.97, Europe is 25. Film is 24, with 23.97 being the digital video equivalent. The reasons date waaaaay back to the origins of film and video, and what the equipment was capable of handling at the time, but there isn't any really good reason for the framerates being different at this point, other than the standards have been around forever, and all the equipment that already exists needs those formats.
    As far as tracking, how fast you can move the camera will depend a lot on the camera itself. For example, if it is using a CMOS sensor, then any quick movement is going to result in severe rolling shutter, which will hinder accurate tracking drastically. Also, the framerate will be a factor, as the more frames you have, the less motion blur will exist in each frame. Similarly, the shutter speed will be a factor, as a very fast shutter speed will help keep things from blurring even during fast camera movements, and less blur means better tracking. Then, what exactly you are filming, and the amount of light in the scene, will also be factors.
    But as a general rule, if you want to track a shot, lots of light, good exposure, good contrast in the scene, fast shutter, and slow camera moves are all your friend.
    So, the different between Europe and the US is a standard.. That explains that! I have a Sony Handycam Digital Hi 8mm that I use and here is a project I was working on, (then Hitfilm came out), if you want to check it out tell me what you think about the motion on it
    By the way I was working on 3D with the video so the colors are all different!! I also have a Cannon Powershot A3300 IS Digital Camera I got a few months ago and the video quality is great, so clear and clean looking. I read in the manual that I can change the shutter speed on it, but not sure if that works with the Video part.. If you don't mind what is a good Shutter speed and what is a good framerate speed for a kind of fast movement, like panning from left to right?? Also, Vision Lab, since it was discontinued, can I put that on more than one computer? Thanks, Chad