Terminator robotic face showing

JPS333JPS333 Website User Posts: 119 Just Starting Out

hey guys! I have been asked to do some special effects for  a freinds school project amd he needs me to do something like out of terminator were you can see the robot face. I was thinking about using mochas shape tracking data or maybe using green paint on the face and replacing it but I kind of want to keep it with just using trackers. 

as always all comments and suggestions are very much appreaciated. 

Thank you! 

Comments

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador

    My suggestion is to do that with practical makeup. Cinema Secrets has some half robot face pieces. Overall you'll just get a better look starting with a practical with some digital enhancements for eye-glows, etc. 

    I can't track it down right now, but there's a mocha Webinar that has a section on attaching 3D models to a human face. I'll track it down for you tomorrow. If you decide to go all-digital, there's good info in it for you. 

     

  • JPS333JPS333 Website User Posts: 119 Just Starting Out

    Wow thanks for the quick response! Since its a school project i have to keep the level of Practial effects we use down . But other wise thank you so much I really appreaciate your effort! 

  • rgbiirgbii Website User Posts: 965 Just Starting Out

    I haven't seen the robot face pieces Triem23 mentioned, but here's two that might help. 

     

     

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador
    edited May 2015

    Ok, about an hour into this webinar they go into using Cinema 4D with mocha to stick a model to an actor's face. You should be able to figure out how to adapt to Hitfilm. (Watch this whole thing when you get a chance. It covers a few things the Hitfilm specific tutorials don't.) You'll see in the webinar that Martin Brennan didn't use markers on the face and still got a solid track. 

    Take a look at this Axel tutorial for more information on tracking objects in Hitfilm. Basically you camera solve first, then track your object. 

    Otherwise, to make your life easier. Shoot the shots with your face replacement on a tripod with as little camera move as possible. That will simplify your tracking and you can use the camera shake plug-in in post to add some motion if you need it. 

    Keep your robot parts up around eyes and forehead. Those parts of the face are more rigid--if you take it down to the jaw, all that flexible, moving skin is problematic. 

    Oh, yeah, check this out. There's a couple of good hints here on problem tracks. Especially how Mary Poplin moves the tracking spline around to avoid a moving cast shadow. The basic lesson is that mocha is a planar tracker--it's tracking an area to stick a rectangular shape to, but you have a lot of flexibility in tracking. As long as your spline is staying more or less on the same plane you can shift your tracking spline around. For a face this means that the side of the forehead, and side of cheek can be the same plane. 

  • JPS333JPS333 Website User Posts: 119 Just Starting Out

    I am astonished on how much effort you guys put in for this! Thank you so much you guys helped so much!

  • KirstieTKirstieT Staff Administrator, Moderator, Website User Posts: 1,056 Staff

    @JPS333 - we're very lucky to have such a knowledgeable, generous community of HitFilm users. Never any problem too large for them :)

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador

    Doesn't take too long to copy/paste links to good tutorials and toss in a hint or two. ;-) 

    As KristieT notes, we're lucky enough to have a good community here--I've gotten a lot of help from other users when I need it. I've gotten good tips on the Particle sim from Orange Pekoe and mark_e. Mark_e really showed everyone about the power of Caustics, NxVisual gave some good advice on particles and models, and built a nice Dalek Mothership for me (not to mention a sexy model pack I believe FxHome may be giving away very soon. Rgbii, StormyKnight, Robin, StevensBilderwelt, MichaelJames, Tooshka, Phil Wesson, Inscape Digital ... All of these users and more have had great advice and tips. And of course the FxHome staff are quite active. Especially Axel and Simon--tutorial masters--who occasionally drop killer tips, casually in a thread. 

    Then we all get better together! 

  • OutlineEntertainmentOutlineEntertainment Website User Posts: 22
    edited May 2015

    Since it's "only" a school project you'll have to see how advanced you want to go, but generally speaking the "proper" way of doing it would be tracking the head in a point based tracker (like the one included with Blender) and then object solving it. That way you get quite  accurate 3D transformation, rotating and scaling information.

    If you aren't familiar with point based trackers or it simply would be too much work, I'd suggest you should try the following:

    -Use mocha HitFilm
    -Track multiple shapes on different perspective planes of the face/head
    -Camera solve the scene using the shapes you just created
    -Export your tracking data to HitFilm
    -In HitFilm import your tracking data, you'll see that you now have a moving camera
    -Place the 3D model you want to apply in your scene, use the point layers exported from mocha as reference
    -Done! (The 3D model will remain still, but since the camera had been tracked relatively to the face, it appears that the 3D model is locked on to it.)

    Of course you still have to adjust lighting, color correction, grain, etc. for your 3D Model, but you should get a general idea, of how you could accomplish a shot like this one. Hope that helped.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador

    Outline gives a good text breakdown of the process. (Except you have to solve the camera before to track the objects)

    The Axel tutorial I linked above will go through the stages of solving the camera and tracking objects. The mocha webinar I linked above will show tracking the face and attaching the 3D model to the tracking points--the webinar does the tracking in Cinema 4D, but it's basically the same in Hitfilm--parenting the object to the point.

    Oh, yeah--another tip (And this is a tip I picked up from Orange Pekoe). When you shoot your footage with your actor shoot a good hi-res still the set---then turn your camera around and get a good hi-res still of what's BEHIND the camera. Take these stills into your photo editor of choice and place them side by side in a single image. What you're doing here is taking bits of the edges of both images and blending them a bit so you don't have a hard line where the frames meet. (If you don't have a photo editor, you can do this in Hitfilm itself: Make a 4096x2048 composite shot to load your still into and use masking tools to blend edges.)

    What you're doing with this image is making a semi-environment map. It won't be a correct spherical panorama, but it WILL give you something to use as an environment map you can assign to your robot face to get kind-of proper reflections. You can see the type of reflections this cheap workaround can give about 30 seconds into this clip:

    If you have the time and equipment to put together a full spherical panorama, that's better (your reflections will be 100% correct).

  • OutlineEntertainmentOutlineEntertainment Website User Posts: 22
    edited May 2015

    @Triem23: Sorry, if I wasn't quite clear. I actually meant to track the head (and nothing else) first and then use the camera solve resulting from that. That way you can just place your 3D model(s) in HitFilm and while they stay perfectly still, from the camera's perspective it seems like they are moving with the face. This works because it doesn't matter, whether an object moves relatively to the camera, or the camera moves by the same amount relatively to the object (but in the opposite direction).

    I also wanted to note, that you can only get away using one of the simpler methods explained (only utilizing mocha HitFilm and Hitfilm), if the face that has to be tracked isn't deforming.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador
    edited May 2015

    @OutlineEntertainmant, oooh,  that is clever. All the material I have come across solves camera first, then track the object, but by lying to mocha, you really can get a good track off a single object if it's comprised from multiple planes! I never realized/thought about it that way! Great tip, and thank you! 

    What would you track? I think front-forehead, temple/top cheekbone and bridge of nose to start? 

    What was that thing I said above about this being a great forum? :-D

    @JPS333 what outline said about deformation is why I recommend keeping things on the forehead. 

    He correctly notes you can point track in Blender. Any After Effects after CS5 can point track. There are other options. In any case, you would want to make certain you save your tracking data in Maya(>FILE<. ma) format to import to Hitfilm. 

  • OutlineEntertainmentOutlineEntertainment Website User Posts: 22
    edited May 2015

    @Triem23 What I'd track really depends on the scene, tracking the areas you suggested should work quite well. (But of course they're not always in frame and as mentioned you have to look out for distortion, etc..)

    @JPS333 If you want to go the complex route (using a point tracker to solve a rigid body object track and then eventually projecting deforming tracks on to a base mesh) I'd suggest giving Blender a try, it is by far the cheapest solution (it's free!) and it also works quite well if you still want to do the rendering HitFilm since you can directly export HitFilm Composite Shots using this AddOn: http://hitfilm.com/forum/discussion/4602/updated-blender-hitfilm-script/p2

  • JPS333JPS333 Website User Posts: 119 Just Starting Out

    I thank all of you for all of your effort! I will certainly try each method! Thank you once again

  • spydurhankspydurhank Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,828 Ambassador
    edited May 2015

    No tut yet but I did the same thing in the video below.

    I matchmoved the video in Blender and Mocha HF.  

     

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,280 Ambassador

    Ok, creepy as *<"(... 

    Jps333, notice spydurhank kept the effect mostly on the top of the head, and the actress didn't move her face much? This is what Outline and  I, mentioned about deformation. If she had been moving her eyebrows or jaw that would be a lot harder to do. Key point, make sure your Terminator is facially still and "dead." First, robot. Second, makes your effects easier to do. 

  • JPS333JPS333 Website User Posts: 119 Just Starting Out

    That was creepy and cool! Okay so I must keep the actors face very bland. I understand, thank you both @spydurhank and @Triem23.

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