How bad is editing without a GPU

Nicolal
Nicolal Website User Posts: 2 Just Starting Out*

Hello my friends, I have question concerning the usage of Hitfilm in combination with a Laptop with an i7-1165G7 and 16GB Ram (Lenovo Campus Thinkbook 14S Yoga). The Laptop has no GPU and I wanted to ask some of you fellas with a smiliar Laptop to share your experiences. I just would like to know if it is really awful or okay.

Best Answer

  • krishd3
    krishd3 Website User Posts: 57 Enthusiast
    Accepted Answer

    I have a old desktop with 4gb ram, intel i3-3220T @2.8GHz, no GPU, hitfilm express runs decently on HD videos, above that it lags, and also in HD it lags on heavy things, Having a gpu increases the playback speed and export speed on most of the softwares, Davinci is the only one I know which depends mostly on GPU.

    GPU doesn't make that big problems, the playback would be handled by your ram and CPU, and the export would depend on the power of CPU.

    Right now I run Hitfilm Pro on a Mac Pro, which has 64GB vRAM on the GPUs, but the difference is just 10% of faster performance.

Answers

  • Nicolal
    Nicolal Website User Posts: 2 Just Starting Out*
    @krishd3 thanks for your answer!
  • triforcefx
    triforcefx United StatesModerator, Website User Posts: 1,271 Moderator

    @Nicolal

    While I don’t have any hands-on experience with that system, it should be plenty capable of handling most HitFilm tasks at a reasonable speed. The new 11th Gen Intel CPUs (including yours) use the new Intel Xe graphics which are far better than older models of integrated graphics processors and are comparable to some dedicated laptop graphics offerings, such as the NVIDIA MX line.

    Since Express is free, give it a go and let us know how it goes!

  • Triem23
    Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 19,956 Ambassador

    To a certain extent it will depend on what types of videos you edit.

    Hitfilm handles streaming of video frames off storage drives, and writing exported frames to drive during renders via the CPU. H.264 video can be GPU accelerated using either the integrated GPU in a CPU or using dedicated GPU hardware.

    If, for the most part, you're mostly slicing up footage, adding some text, and maybe doing a little color correction you'll be fine. If you're intending on getting into complex, multilayered compositing or full 3D animation you'll find yourself hitting the limits of the integrated Iris XE pretty quickly. Mostly due to the lack of dedicated VRAM.

    The Iris Xe built into your CPU is... actually not too bad! It won't stand up to a mid-to high dedicated GPU, but the Iris Xe (barely) outperforms things like the Nvidia MX-series (their lowest end laptop cards), which is pretty impressive, all things considered.

  • krishd3
    krishd3 Website User Posts: 57 Enthusiast

    Yes, my old CPU stuck on particles, even exporting a 40secs video almost took 10 minutes if I just make a single png a 3d, and if I was to edit the tasks that I do now on my mac pro, in that old crap, it would blast in some seconds, literally, 4k 60fps, sometimes raw 8k for better zooming quality in post production, 3D models, chrome, blender, and many of the tasks depending on GPU now would have been transferred on CPU, it will literally blast, or never work again.