Real white balance

8KMAX
8KMAX Website User Posts: 186 Just Starting Out

Forgive my noob question, but I've had it for a long time and I couldn't get an answer just by looking online:

My question is about the white balance on camera. Typically, in nature at least, when shooting a video during sunrise, the whites in the image will have a slight yellow cast. When recording this type of scene with the camera's automatic white balance function, the reality of the scene is usually maintained. That is, the white of the image will continue to have a yellowish tint due to the reflection of the sun at dawn. The automatic white balance of my camera, Fujifilm X-T3, is appalling. Therefore I am forced to use a default profile for the white balance (daylight, shade, tungsten ...) or use an image with something white to define the value. The option of choosing a white balance profile is out of the equation for me, as it is very imprecise and not valid for all scenarios. Therefore, I have the option of defining the white balance manually. The problem is that when you do this (shoot something white so the camera decides the white balance), what actually has a yellowish tint, becomes absolute white. That is, when photographing a sunrise scene, the whites will be totally pure, not like in reality they would have a yellow tint. Does anyone know how I can set the white balance manually so that it respects reality? (Just for you to know, the camera also allows the user to set the kelvin value manually)

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 2,005 Enthusiast
    edited December 2020

    http://fujifilm-dsc.com/en/manual/x-t3/

    For this, I would use a regular white piece of paper. You don't need anything more advanced.

    Then in post you correct problems, and after that you grade it if you want to.

    I'm not sure if the XT3 can shoot RAW video, but if it does, enable it no matter the resolution.

    Using magic lantern on my now dead Canon 600D, RAW in 950x540 looked way better while giving more data to work with in post compared to the standard 1920x1080 setting at 24 fps.

    I'm by no means a Fuji guru though. But basic white balance and flat profiles should exist, I'd think.

  • 8KMAX
    8KMAX Website User Posts: 186 Just Starting Out
    edited December 2020

    @kevin_n; Thanks for your fast reply, it is really appreciated :)

    If I photographed a white paper, I would end up with an "unnatural" perfect white image, which is not what I am looking for.

    E.g: If in a sunset scene I photograph a white paper and set it to serve as a "white balance profile", all whites in the sunset video will not be orange-tinted any more. Therefore, the result will differ from the real white that the naked-eye was seeing.

    As for if the camera can shoot RAW, it does not at the moment. At least not internally. I am recording on 10bit 4:2:2 externally in LOG, though.

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 2,005 Enthusiast
    edited December 2020

    If I photographed a white paper, I would end up with an "unnatural" perfect white image, which is not what I am looking for.

    The sensor can see more than we ever could imagine. I think what's happening is that the display you're viewing the image on, whether it's the camer's LCD or your monitor. It's best to view it in a histogram, do you have a histogram available for us to take a look at?

    Try something neutral grey (18% of the light is reflected back), these are sold but honestly something close, not sparkly would give you close to the same result. Color is highly subjective in the end, it's not as important as you might think. And calibration is is a whole different issue.

    https://expertphotography.com/grey-card-white-balance/

    Here's a real problem: If I calibrate my monitor right at this moment, I better hope I'm in a window less basement with no lights on, because the moment the color temperature changes even by a macro amount (kelvin), my monitor is no longer displaying accurate color, not to mention the brightness degradation that comes with all visible light in our monitors. Also, my perception of color is not the same as yours. You and I may perhaps not be colorblind, it's just how things are. Imagine outdoors.

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