[ENHANCEMENT] More filter types in File Open dialog

NormanPCN
NormanPCN Website User Posts: 4,062 Enthusiast

Right now there is one filter and this includes all file types Imerge can open.

This is fine but I suggest you have additional more selective filter options. For example

.imerge files solo

Camera raw files grouped and/or a filter for each separate manufacturer raw file(s).

Pixel image files grouped.

Any other groupings you think might be useful.

note: .imerge is listed twice in the current filter.

Also, when you have multiple filters, the selected filter should probably/maybe be sticky. Certainly sticky for a given runtime, and maybe sticky across invocations. Maybe multiple stickies by context.

Comments

  • Triem23
    Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 19,268 Ambassador

    Possible groupings:

    • "RGB Bitmaps" for BMP, JPG and other formats that don't support alpha.
    • "RGBA Bitmaps" for PNG, TGA, TIFF and other formats that support alpha.
    • "RAW" for RAW, DNG, CR2/3, etc.
    • "HDR" for EXR, HDR and other formats that can store 32-bit color data. here I question if TIFF, TGA, PNG and other formats that can store 14-16 bits/channel should be here? This is where "jargon drift" becomes annoying. In Photo work, the 12-14 bit color of most sensors is considered "SDR," as photo editing apps have been able to work with 16-bit/channel images for decades. Now, of course, in VIDEO, anything OVER 8-bits is called "HDR." Me, I say 10-bit video sure as hell is NOT "HDR," but idiot marketing people (with apologies to Kirstie or Oli, should they ever read this) decided to appropriate a term with a specific, technical meaning and water it down for idiot consumers rather than coin a new, useful, and prcise term, like, say, "XDR" for "eXtendened Dynamic Range." Anyways, the point is, if you want to stick with the decades-old established definition of HDR in the photo world, then an "HDR" sort should only include 32-bit/channel formats like EXR, HDR and other RGBE formats. Otherwise, if you wish to use the VIDEO definition of "HDR," (which is WRONG), then this can include any file format that can hold more than 8-bits per channel. I'm sure the Imerge devs have zero interest in my related rant on how the term "PBR" has been devalued by generic use when people are really talking about BDRF-shaders, so I'll just side note that Cook-Torrance means the requirements for "Physically-based rendering" and Hitfilm's been "PBR" since v4.
    • "Indexed Color" for images that supported limited palettes, like BMP, GIF, PNG, TIFF and TGA.
    • "Project Files" for quickly finding Imerge projects and nothing else.
  • NormanPCN
    NormanPCN Website User Posts: 4,062 Enthusiast

    While I am all for selective filtering, file open dialogs are limited to filtering by extension. Exact file contents are not considered. For example, TIFF can fit most of the separations listed (index, alpha, HDR). It all depends on the precise contents. File open/save dialog filters are pretty basic and about as "zero work" as it gets. It is just adding a few characters to a string to add more filters.

    Here is an example from some of my own code. The | characters are converted to null chars when passing this to the OS.

    Source Files|*.mod;*.def|IMP Modules|*.mod|DEF Modules|*.def|C/C++ Source|*.h;*.hpp;*.c;*.cpp|C/C++ header|*.h;*.hpp|Assembly source|*.asm;*.s|BAK Files|*.bak|Code Listing|*.lst|Map File|*.map|Text file|*.txt|Script file|*.sbs|Batch files|*.bat;*.cmd|All (*)|*|

    --

    On another note, I agree about the video world bad use of the term HDR for 10+ bit video. To me HDR is more range than a sensor can capture. Whatever that is. Does not have to be 32-bits per channel. 16-bit float is more than enough. Around 30 stops according to ILM. Most HDR apps save 32-bit float for HDR files. I suppose 32-bit integer has enough range to be considered HDR by these definitions., but once you go 32-bit just go float.

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