Questions about live concerts, camera, gear, tech, ect.

CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
So I just came back from a big conference called "Challenge" it was literally life changing. Any way when I got to Kansas City my youth pastor told me we were helping with "set up" which I thought was going to be boring... But NO! We literally got to work with a traveling crew to build a really awesome setup! After unloading 2 moving vehicles of stuff full of trusts and boxes we got to work! Among many jobs I helped the electrician do something way over my head, nailed together trust systems, tied up sheets to cover wiring, spotted speakers as they lifted the setup, and set up the controll area in the back (sound and light boards cameras ect). It was awesome! After it was all done we had an awesome 3 projector screen setup with tons of lights, and the guy said it pulled acouple thousand watts (I don't remember). This lead me two some questions... Knowing that some of you might have a job with this I thought I would ask.
1. The electrician guy had me plugging in really thick cables.... My confusion is that their were 3 colors. All I know is their needs to be a power plug and a grounder... What am I missing?
2. The screens were projected on from the back, and frequently live streamed video from one of the cameras. What would happen if a camera was live recording a screen displaying what it had sent. And it was perfectly aligned?
3. The camera on the giant jib was incredible (really wish I had talked to the operator, but he didn't help with setup) it was yes a huge camera, however I was so impressed! With all the crazy light rigging and sequencing it took lighting that would freak out a camera and displayed it crystal clear. Basically it was always perfectly exposed and never saturated with one color. It also handled flares nicely by putting only one or 2 layers on each light, and they never covered up the viewers view. It handled swooping to the super lit stage to the scarcely lit audience so nicely. If you had to guess how much did that camera cost? How about the jib? What lenses might I be able to put on my puny camera to get it to see like that?
4. I frequently watched the master feed board where the head honcho was choosing the video to be displayed. I found two things odd mabye you can explain them.
A. When text was one the screen so we could sing along their was a box on the guys screen that has the text surronded by green. How come they used chroma key and didn't transfer a video with transparencies to put ontop of the live feed? How come green? Which computer removed it?
B. On the main screen their were allways really epic loops. Like they make usuall loops look dumb, and they were complex. However unlike other loops they didn't seem to have a seam making them technically not be a loop. Do you think that had a long sample, clever key framing, or had a computer rendering it? It was fun to guess how I might create the effect inside of hitfilm.
Thanks for awnsering.

Comments

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,262 Ambassador
    Tackling these questions:
    1: Three power leads, Positive, neutral, ground. Basically, Positive and Negative are carrying current, Ground is for safety.
    2: You'd get something known as video feedback or "howlround" A good example is here. of course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjDFvoRNpOM. All the Doctor Who titles up till Jon Pertwee's last season were make with video feedback. Concert systems tend to have 2-4 frames of latency, which, among other things, helps prevent this feedback. Video feedback can damage a monitor--think of it as trying to blend itself in ADD mode forever--but, if you connect a camera directly to a monitor, you can play with it--it's fun!
    3: Bad news first--there's probably nothing you can do to get your camera to look like that. There's just too much difference between that level of gear and our level of gear. Cranes usually have wide angle lenses, trying to stretch the space out and make the move look bigger. Something between an 8mm and 15mm. I can't guess on the cost of camera and jib, because a "Large" camera could be a $15,000 Panasonic or a $50,000 RED to more. The jib/crane could have been anywhere from $2000 to $150,000, depending on model. It's just really hard to guess there, Caleb. For a convention setup, I would guess likely low-to-mid level gear, so, maybe a $5k jub and a $15k camera, bu that's a guess.
    4: A) depends on the setup being used. Tricasters and A/TEM's are different from dedicated boards and switchers, it was possible the board didn't have alpha keys, but, unlikely. The graphics could have been done by a third party who gave green and there wasn't time to re do it. The board could have one green and one alpha keyer and green was text and alpha something else. It's most likely that the key was handled at the switcher.
    B) Chances are those were prerendered sequences. Kept as a library for bumpers, transitions and backgrounds. Without seeing the loops, I wouldn't know how to begin, but, as always, the key os to build something. Then add something else. Then add more. See what you get. Remember the stuff that looks good. :-)
    Sounds like a good day--and getting a glimpse at the level of preparation it takes to set up a convention hall/concert makes you understand how those same challenges can be magnified greatly on a TV/Film shoot! Think about how much harder it would be to light if you were trying to HIDE the lights, not pt them on a big truss!
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435

    2: You'd get something known as video feedback or "howlround" A good example is here. of course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sjDFvoRNpOM. All the Doctor Who titles up till Jon Pertwee's last season were make with video feedback. Concert systems tend to have 2-4 frames of latency, which, among other things, helps prevent this feedback. Video feedback can damage a monitor--think of it as trying to blend itself in ADD mode forever--but, if you connect a camera directly to a monitor, you can play with it--it's fun!

    Wow that is so weird.  I would have never guessed the dr who thing.  It is so cool!  Thankyou for all the answers.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,262 Ambassador
    Here's another Doctor Who example for video feedback.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyI-5e1IrEo
    This first video is the 5th Doctor's opening titles. This is all hand-painted starfields, hand animated with a rostrum camera, but I'm using it for reference for the next video.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mN7svUbfxQ
    This is the 2'nd title sequence for the 6th Doctor... As you can see it's similar to the 5th's--it's the same basic rostrum animation, but you can also see that for this version they pointed a camera at a monitor and mixed in some video feedback--the shimmering bits at the edges of the screen.
    Have you had a chance to play with video feedback yet? It's a fun thing to play with, but I should not that it's possible these days to get similar effects in Hitfilm!
    Here's a bit more information on video feedback:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_feedback
    http://blog.art21.org/2011/09/21/how-to-harness-the-creative-potential-of-the-video-feedback-loop/#.U8SeV7FAniE
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