Question about video editors with good workflow

CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
No offense to hit film but.....  It doesn't have the most fast, simple 2d editor.  I was shopping and i came across adobe premiere.  And I watched a trailer and fell in love.
(i won't post the link cause you'll be tempted to fall into adobe's money grab)
I love that it displays information above the video, multi cam editing, color grading,  and it would be really nice to be able to render these things while still working in HitFilm.  Oh and having two viewing screens and the size inside the interface they were in looks really nice.
So i whent to the wonderful land of amazon and thought it only costed 70$ (that version turned out to be no more powerful then windows movie maker) and the full version was like 700 (for the older version) furthermore adobe recently decided to make their projects inaccessible to people like me under the disguise of "creative cloud" which requires a subscription (with me not having a steady income that wont work out). 
Anyway now i am left heartbroken with 100$ burning a hole in my pocket.  Can anyone suggest an editor that is simpler yet has a great workflow? I know it probably won't do as much as premier would do.

Comments

  • rgbiirgbii Website User Posts: 965 Just Starting Out
    I'd recommend Sony Movie Studio.  There are a couple of versions around and under $100.  The latest, 13, will integrate with HF too.
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
    I'd recommend Sony Movie Studio.  There are a couple of versions around and under $100.  The latest, 13, will integrate with HF too.

    Unfortunately I'm on a mac :(

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,244 Ambassador
    OOOOhhhh.... On Mac you're pretty much stuck with iMovie, Premiere, Avid and Final Cut.
    Didn't DaVinci Resolve add a lot of editing features?
  • ivanhurbaivanhurba Website User Posts: 27
    Caleb, You can try Lightworks on a Mac, they'll open the beta soon and if you're keyboard oriented it will be blazingly fast, also you can add Hitfilm as an Assistant App, which is not a perfect system, but works.
    And Triem23 is right, Resolve 11 will soon be released and will include a lot of editing updates which can hopefully make it a viable alternative.
    I liked CC but the PITA was that every time I had to open an app it said I had to renew my subscription. I'm not giving adobe any more money until this issue has been fixed and if Hitfilm can get EDL or AAF I won't need Adobe for anything, so hurry up FXHOME!
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    That price differential is precisely why we created HitFilm in the first place, Caleb. For a particular type of filmmaker there just isn't much software support - especially if you're wanting to do VFX. Our current editing system is indeed just the 'essentials' (something we hope to enhance in the future). If you're on Mac, you should really check out FCPX, though - after a rocky start, it's very well respected now.
    I actually started out editing in Premiere, way back around 2000. Doing ANYTHING with digital video back then on a consumer budget was insanely hard. This was many years before HD and YouTube existed, and digital storage in general had only just started to appear: pretty much everything was still tape-based, and often still analogue tape. It was a dark time.
    Anyway, I still really like Premiere - using it recently to test the HitFilm Plugins was a real pleasure. For The Interview I actually had a nice hybrid workflow, with Premiere as my lead editor, HitFilm 2 Ultimate as my lead compositor, and then HitFilm Plugins in Premiere for final grading. Worked really nicely - and backed up our assertion that we want people to be able to use our stuff regardless of their workflow preferences.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,244 Ambassador
    2000? Man, in film school at Chapman University we were taking telecined film on Betacam, capturing 320x240 proxys, cutting in D-Vision (which became Avid), then using our EDL to recapture the full-res video for print-to-tape. Through a $10000 Targa board doing 640x480 video in MPEG-2 @ 2.5 mbps encode. Pitiful. I used to take the proxys off the mighty 1 terabyte server all 250 students and staff shared via my awesome 1GB Jaz drive to do audio edits in Vegas.
    In 2000 I got my first mini-DV cam. Firewire was the greatest thing ever, and a 64 GB drive could hold enough for maybe two short films and assets.
    Gotta say, when waiting for real-time tape capture to finish so you could swap tapes and keep... Waiting... There was a lot of student editors chain smoking....
    Still remember that last 36-hour-straight-through work rush to get 'Bliss' on tape in time to screen... Ah, my 20's...
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Oh, I'd done some editing previously, but on dual-VCRs - or, even, between a camcorder and a single VCR, with a minidisc on the side for ridiculously inaccurate audio dubbing. So, yeah, relatively speaking, the digital frontier of the early 2000s was incredible. I mean, that scene is what spawned FXHOME as a company, after all.
    It's remarkable how far we've come in just over a decade.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,244 Ambassador
    Oh, man, I still have stuff from the 80's where the picture edit was hitting play/pause on two VHS decks, then for audio dumping the VHS down another generation and playing music from a tape deck, samples from a casio SK1 and frantic foley thru a little 4 channel mixer in a single, real-time pass.
    A fun way to spend my teens.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,240 Staff
    edited May 2014
    I remember doing stop-motion as a kid with a full-size VHS camcorder, where you couldn't shoot a single frame at a time, so we would hit Start/Stop as quickly as we could, to record a fraction of a second, then move the models and hit the button again.
    The year I got my first Mini-DV camcorder and moved to digital editing, I also got a new computer with a 27GB harddrive, which was the largest storage available.  Seems absurd now..
  • rgbiirgbii Website User Posts: 965 Just Starting Out
    My dad, brothers and I used to do the stop-motion with 16mm. About 15 years ago I converted all our old 16mm to digital. Was fun watching them again, but so glad things have advanced.
    Somewhere around here I have an old Amiga toaster with a newtek card, a couple of genlocks and a hardware chroma keyer. Fun stuff but completely useless now a days.
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