The world of dune

CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
Wow! Today I finally got to watch dune and it was incredible! Though I had to take notes like I was at a lecture I found most of it enjoyable (their were a few creepy scenes that made my stomach churn that were not necessary). Even though most call this production of it a flop I say the contrary. The detail people put into all the sets was extraordinary and on blu ray digitally enhanced wow it was breathtaking! I was just curious about what you guys think of dune. Have you seen the HD version?
I also wondering if possibly another director might take dune on as a movie, because I feel like with modern day technology they could clean up the animation of the worms and composite much smoother.
This also reminded me about how privileged we are to se the movies these days. If even one effect is bad everyone gets mad at it, however I firmly believe that when it comes to special effects that you should not define the amount that you use based on if you can pull them off perfectly. To me special effects are just a storytelling, and if they are realistic that is icing on a cake.

Comments

  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
    Also for you what other sci if classics should I watch (excluding mainstream star treck and Star Wars)
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    edited May 2014
    You're referring to the 1984 Dune? Beautiful film, great production design, amazing cast, and I love Toto's soundtrack.
    That show had a troubled production history, and is a rough book to translate into film. The theatrical cut originally had Lynch credited under a pseudonym, since he pulled his name off. Lynch's original cut was close to four hours and he was unhappy with studio-demanded cuts. Lynch changed several key plot elements (in the novel, the wierding way was a combined yoga/martial arts/meditation philosophy, not a sonic weapon) which made purists angry, but I think it's an under-rated film.
    Fun fact--when the first sandworm test footage came back, producer Raffella DeLaurentis moaned "we're going to get an 'X' rating!" There's a reason you never see a shot of a sandworm with it's maw closed.
    Classic sci-fi? Forbidden Planet, the 1950's War of the World, 2001 and 2010, The Andromeda Strain, The Forbin Project, Blade Runner, Big Trouble in Little China, Alien, Aliens, Escape from New York, the 1954 Gojira (Japanese edit, not the re-cut with Raymond Burr).
    These are some 1950's to 80's movies.
    Oh. Babylon 5. Simon Jones will agree. You must watch Babylon 5.
  • NullUnitNullUnit Website User Posts: 791 Just Starting Out
    edited May 2014
    Those are all good classics.
    I would add THX-1138 (directors cut). I honestly think it's George Lucas's best movie and a good example of a directors cut that actually improves the movie (no one likes to admit it, but the Empire Strikes Back directors cut improves the movie as well). THX is also notable for the amazing chase scene at the end which Lucas would basically recreate in Star Wars. 
    The Last Star Fighter, I wont tell you about it, its just a great movie and everyone should see it. 
    Tron, another must see classic. 
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    Ooh, three more good choices.
    Oh, the original Planet of the Apes quintet... Soylent Green... The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
    Robotech. It's controversial to some fans because it's cut togetherfrom three series, but it has it 's own story, and, frankly I can't think of another American cartoon that did 85 episodes of continuing arc. The level of mature storytelling of that show was unparalleled in American tv animation to that point.
    Transformers: the Movie (1986). You don't need to watch the series. This movie is the pinnacle of the entire franchise.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    I think the Dune miniseries from 2000 is vastly better than the 1984 film, though it does suffer from the SciFi channel syndrome of occasional poor compositing and effects.  Its sequel, the miniseries Children of Dune, is also decent, and has my favorite score from anything, ever.
  • ivanhurbaivanhurba Website User Posts: 27
    It's memory lane time! I agree with all of the films and add Explorers (like Harry Potter with aliens) and the Excellent adventures of Bill and Ted. We could write a list for a whole year here! The Fly, Batteries not included! Nearly all of the chapters of Amazing Stories and the Twilight Zone from the eighties series, the tales of the gold monkey!
    I remember breaking a couple of VHS tapes watching all this films and series again and again. Sci-fi has never been very mainstream in Spain and had to supply good entertainment by myself.
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Aaaah, so many great suggestions here. :D
    Dune is an interesting one - I remember being intrigued but utterly perplexed when I watched it as a kid. Though even then I was stunned by the Harkonnen interiors.
    Having read the book for the first time a couple of years ago, I really should check out the miniseries.
  • RossTrowbridgeRossTrowbridge Website User Posts: 423 Enthusiast
    Cocoon 
    Silent running
    Blade Runner
    Phase 4
    The Monolith Monsters (50's sci-fi that gave me nightmares as a kid)
  • StormyKnightStormyKnight Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador
    edited May 2014
    "Babylon 5" for SURE!
    "Farscape" is pretty cool too but like B5, you really have to pay attention while watching.
    One that didn't quite last a season but got a cult following world wide after it was canceled and definitely worth watching- "Firefly"......and the follow-up movie which came out after the series- "Serenity".
    "Logan's Run" (original with Michael York)
    If you can find it- "Them!" is good for at least one viewing.
    And although not a lot of science fiction at first but more and more as the story unfolds, "Lost". Personally, I think it's the best story telling of any show. A surprise moment (sometimes more than one) in every single episode and it keeps you guessing right up to the bitter end.

    rtrowbridge- I just saw the Monolith Monsters a couple months ago on "Svnegoolie" on MeTV. I can see why that would scare a youngster. Gave me the creeps and now I have an inexplicable fear of the Washington Monument. ;) 
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Lost's an interesting one because it really is quite divisive. For example, I think it's some of the worst storytelling to ever happen on TV. :)
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    edited May 2014
    Ooh, Silent Running... How could I forget that?
    Oh, I will say Plan 9 from Outer Space. It's, honestly, one of the worst films ever made, but every film nerd should see it.
    Buckaroo Banzai.
    Battle Beyond the Stars--a Roger Corman take on The Magnificent Seven: first movie James Horner scored, and SFX by James Cameron!
    ARIKA.
    Flash Gordon (1980). Campy as all hell, but great production design, and Pierce Brosnan and BRIAN! BLESSED!!! SHOUTING!!!!!
    Death Race 2000 (1976) not the remake.
    Road Warrior, Mad Max and Max Max: Beyond Thunderdome.
    The Sci-fi Channel miniseries of Dune is far more accurate to the books, but, for me, it suffers from boring design (the Fremen look like Robin Hood and his Merry Men with filter masks. Lynch's stillsuits needed hoods, but they looked awesome and functional, and must have been hell during a desert location shoot) , bland acting (Jurgen Prochnow's Duke Leto is a dynamic, charismatic leader. William Hurt's Duke Leto is boring) and inexplicable changing of names (it's "har-KO-nan" not ("HAR-ka-non").
    It's still worth a watch, mind you. But I am more entertained by the Lynch.
    @Simon: I'm with you. Lost is terrible. Since I also failed to enjoy Prometheus (terrible) , Cowboys and Aliens (dull) , World War Z (why throw away the entire novel) , Lens Flare Trek (incoherent) , AND Lens Flare 2: Wrath of Khan was Better (Wrath of Khan really was much better), I can safely avoid anything Lindelof writes from now on.
  • fredclipsfredclips Website User Posts: 228
    My 2 cents.
    LOST was fantastic at the start. It was one of those show that if you missed the first season you would watch then entire thing in one sitting. But this was all counting on the show writers having a plan about where it was going... and they didn't. They really didn't. They made it up as they went along. Story threads left unanswered just shit me! Sorry, but I still get angry at this after putting the time in and being promised answers.
    I was told there would be answers!
    Babylon 5 actually is similar to LOST in some ways. There is some real mystery going on and I was hanging out for answers. In that case I wasn't disappointed. This really was a great show and I would recommended it.
    Firefly and Serenity: Watch them. Not much else to say. The fact this was cancelled so quickly but is still being talked about should tell you something. I was hanging out for my big girls to be old enough to show them. They loved it. They both have trouble believing it was cancelled. Even now at school they will find someone else who has seen it and geek out about it. The other kids look on and ask why they keep going on about this show from years back. Those kids just don't understand...
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    The thing about B5 was that JMS had a 5-year plan, get in, get out, done, and mostly followed it. LOST had an ending, but they were padding. Once they got ABC to agree on a finite series of episodes, they could start focusing on the main plot, but a lot if the filler got dropped.
    Same with BSG--well executed, but story theads not so much woven as stapled to the tapestry.
    B5 did have massive influence. It's one of my favorite shows, but, technically it's:
    First show to be shot 16:9 and cropped 4:3 for later HD wide-screen remastering.
    First show cut all NLE.
    First show to do all-digital FX. (Warner's claimed the data archive, stored it improperly and destroyed all the model, texture and animation data waiting to be fine-tuned and re-rendered for HD. B5 DVD's use the shots which were composed 16:9, but rendered 4:3 for initial broadcast. Matted and stretched. Makes every FX shot fuzzy. And we'll never get the HD remaster.)
    First multi-year arc. Yes, shows would bring back characters, but it wasn't pre planned.
    Finally, the under-$1 million dollar per episode TV production contract for LA is the "Babylon Contract." It was largely negotiated by B5's executive producers.
    First "full", non-Trek American TV show to run more than two seasons since Original Trek. (Quantum Leap doesn't count. That was really an anthology show using a sci-fi premise to backdoor in a common lead (Sam) and narrator (Al).
  • fredclipsfredclips Website User Posts: 228
    The thing about B5 was that JMS had a 5-year plan, get in, get out, done, and mostly followed it. LOST had an ending, but they were padding. Once they got ABC to agree on a finite series of episodes, they could start focusing on the main plot, but a lot if the filler got dropped.


    I agree that is what worked well for B5. It was a story with a beginning and an end. Crazy!
    I disagree with LOST. They didn't know anything. Or, if they did, they changed it after the internet guessed correctly. LOST did it's best to make an ending fit the crap they had come up with, but it never fit well. A round peg and square hole would make more sense than the ending of LOST.

  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    I think Lost's storytelling had a far smaller impact on anybody who watched Babylon 5 in the 90s, or any of the other sci-fi shows which had dabbled with long-form storytelling on TV. But Lost went Proper Mainstream, and thus attracted a load of people who hadn't encountered long-form TV storytelling before, and they though it was amazing (conceptually, it IS amazing - see B5). The problem is that long-form storytelling only works if you have a plan.
    The problem with TV is that it starts broadcasting before the story is finished. That puts the creators in a horrible, horrible position. With a novel, the writer might not have a firm plan, but he'll finish the novel before it's released, and can then edit it so that the whole thing works as a cohesive whole; he can edit in stuff at the start which connects to the end, etc etc. TV producers don't have that luxury, so you've either got to be really on the ball (Babylon 5), go purely episodic and not do long-form (most TV), or just be really good at winging it (Battlestar, mostly, got away with it). Otherwise you're Lost.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    Westworld, Enemy Mine, the 1982 version of The Thing. The Warriors.
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
    Man you really make me feel like i dont have enough time left on the earth.... I have decades of great films I'm behind on!!!!!! 
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    edited June 2014
    You're young--plenty of time to catch up. ;-)
    What's sun with old films is trying to figure out how they did things in a practical manner, since we're mostly looking at pre-CGI films here. For example, there's Disney's 1979 "The Black Hole." (Did I have that on the list? I do now!), where, near the beginning of the movie, our characters are viewing a hologram-table. Since it was 1979, what they did for that effect was set up the FX for the holo display ahead of shooting. Then they set up a piece of plexiglass at a 45 degree angle and projected the holo display on the plexi, which makes it look like a projection floating in air.
    That technique is STILL viable, even in this era of digital!
    Incidentally, "The Black Hole" is the last major studio release to be done all "in-house," which is to say, Disney did everything from sets to costumes to model work to roto to FX animation to CGI (The Black Hole itself is Disney's first CG effect.). After "Black Hole," studios started farming out work to other companies--it's the rise of ILM>
    Also incidentally, check out this compilation:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyULTU9smVQ
    At about 30 seconds when there's that tracking shot behind Cygnus as her engines power up--that's 1978 production. That engine flare was hand-animated! Look at how freaking awesome it looks as the engine flares get occluded by the superstructure of the ship! Fantastic! Same with Palomino when she lifts off at about a minute in--hand animated engine flares and hand traced occlusion!
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
    I have never heard of Black Hole before i really need to watch it wow! Looks awesome
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    Black Hole is great, until the last 5 minutes, when the sci-fi film goes all religious allegory. Gorgeous film, however. Great soundtrack, and a FANTASTIC cast.
  • StormyKnightStormyKnight Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador

    I've heard the criticisms about Lost and I just don't see it the same way. I thought it was brilliantly done and never thought it was being made up on the fly as some critics have suggested and the producers have denied. I know there were casting issues and I suppose, as a writer, you have to try to cover for unexpected changes the best you can. As a viewer, I may not like that someone was replaced suddenly after the first season of a show with little explanation but that's how the story goes or had to go- so I'll accept it.
    I didn't think Lost jumped the shark either.......neither did B5, but the story telling is completely different between the two shows in the respect that Lost uses flashbacks to expand on the characters and an episode is about a day on the island (with a couple exceptions); not to mention that the flashbacks literally become the main story in a few episodes and everything is connected from Desmond to Hurley to the events on the island. I had a blast finding all the instances where characters whose paths crossed before they ever formally met on the island. Or seeing those blasted numbers in places you'd never expect like on the sports team's jerseys at the airport. 
    B5 is a years time in one season and is linear in structure with a couple exceptions (I don't want to reveal any spoilers- B5 fans will know what I mean- season 3 "War Without End" Pts. 1 & 2). The only way the shows are similar is that they are both serial to the max and the creators had a definite vision of the story from beginning to end. I don't see how one could put together a story like these without knowing the whole thing before hand; especially the way they mixed things up in Lost. The continuity was remarkable and there are points where I wonder if they had filmed an entire scene and then broke it into parts to show at different times in the story line- and we're talking instances that are seasons apart.
    I've watched B5 9 or 10 times through (I 'lost' count) and I've watched Lost 7 times through (I know- get a life) and I don't find any unanswered questions in either. In fact, I think they went too far answering some questions in Lost i.e. the thing that made the trees move in the first episode and it's origins. Shhhhhhhh! Spoilers. ;) I was actually hoping they would leave a few mysteries that would never be answered- it's fun to discuss things like that with other fans.


     

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    edited June 2014

    I've heard the criticisms about Lost and I just don't see it the same way. I thought it was brilliantly done and never thought it was being made up on the fly as some critics have suggested and the producers have denied.


    I've heard the criticisms about Lost and I just don't see it the same way. I thought it was brilliantly done and never thought it was being made up on the fly as some critics have suggested and the producers have denied.
    I didn't think Lost jumped the shark either.......neither did B5,

    Actually, the producers of LOST were totally making it up as they went along. A little bit of time on Google will find you all kinds of interviews where varied writers and producers on LOST discuss this. In fact, the showrunners pleaded with ABC to give them a firm ending date to work towards because they were sick of creating filler--such as the episode about how one character got his tattoos (Spoiler: The actor had them to begin with.). Fans of the show can certainly enjoy the storytelling, but LOST was not planned as a multi-year arc from the get-go. neither were new BSG, or X-files, for that matter.
    I leave here this Cracked.com article which hyperlinks to some of these interviews: http://www.cracked.com/article_19043_6-classic-series-you-didnt-know-were-made-up-fly_p2.html
    B5--much as I loved the show--actually DOES jump the shark for about a half season. This was due to some production difficulties. During production, JMS,Netter and Copland thought the plug was being pulled at the end of season four, so he jettisoned several episodes of arc (Mostly the Minbari Civil War) to resolve the Earth Civil War and hit a good stopping point. "Intersections in Real Time," the episode that's all about Sheridan and the Interrogator on Mars was the planned season four finale. When B5 got picked up at the 11th hour by TNT, JMS, Netter and Copland got season 5, but they took a huge budget cut, they lost a day of shooting schedule for each episode, and JMS... well, he had to pad. That plotline of the telepaths with amazing hair (Byron and friends) was originally planned as about 4 episodes, not a half-season. So, yeah, I'll argue that B5 jumps the shark in season five up until the point where Byron *SPOILER REDACTED*. However, the last half of season 5 picks up again.
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435
    [quote name="Triem23" post="43172" timestamp="1401859618"]Black Hole is great, until the last 5 minutes, when the sci-fi film goes all religious allegory. Gorgeous film, however. Great soundtrack, and a FANTASTIC cast.[/quote]
    Sadly allot of old si fi films tried to throw together something religious at the end (dune, 2001) however they are done so horribly that it's embarrassing.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,245 Ambassador
    Well, Dune isn't the best example there. In the original novel religion is one of the main driving forces of the narrative. I already discussed how Lynch reduced the "Weirding Way" from a martial-arts/meditation/philosophy into a sonic weapon, but another good example is the "Missionary Protectiva" which was a subsect of the Bene Gesseret charged with manipulation of religion to implant myths potentially beneficial to Bene Gesseret. In the Lynch film a Fremen shouts "Lisan al-Gib at Paul Atredies." Lisan al-Gib was a Bene Gesseret term, and this Fremen shouting that lets Jessica Atredies know the Missionaria Protectiva have influenced the Fremen. When Jessica and Paul meet Stilgar and go into hiding at Seitch Tabr, Jessica uses these Bene Gessert myths to manipulate the Fremen. Jessica sets Paul up as a savior.
    Lynch glosses over all of this. In fact, he tones down the religious aspects of the source novel so much that the remaining elements of religion in the film jar. But that's kind of the opposite of your example: the religion wasn't tacked in, but torn out.
    2001 also isn't intended as a religious ending. However, the end of 2001as a film is so visually abstract that it's unintelligible without reading the novel. It's not that complicated:Bowman tra els via Stargate to the other side of the galaxy. A monolith recreates familiar surroundings to protect Bowman's sanity. He is analyzed and the monolith realizes Bowman is a descendent of one of thousands of multi-million year experiments in influencing evolution to produce intelligent species. Bowman is told this, re-encoded into pure information, and sent back to Earth to prepare a comprehensive report. Bowman takes the form of an infant in self-realization that, compared to the Monoliths and thier makers, he is nothing more than an innocent, ignorant baby.
    Unfortunately, NONE of that is clear in Kubrick's film. On the other hand, there ia great majesty and mystery in Kubrick's ending, because "David Bowman is encoded as an AI subroutine in a Monolith supercomputer," isn't THAT cool when spelled out simply.
    This is where we run into fundamental issues with making movies from books. Some things don't translate well: Like in "Lord of the Rings," Tolkien writes passages about how the Frodo can feel the malevolent will of Sauron probing and searching for the Ring. Peter Jackson had two choices. 1) Have Elijah Wood whine about, "I can feel it, Sam. I can't feel his mind reaching out to find me," 2) You can turn the Eye of Sauron into a big, **** lighthouse beam. Jackson went with the beam, which looks kind of stupid, but it makes it very clear that Sauron is focusing his attention over THERE!
    Black Hole went into production with no ending, and had a change of writer and producer partway through filming, which is where the metaphysical ending comes in.
  • CalebKCalebK Website User Posts: 435

    Have Elijah Wood whine about, "I can feel it, Sam. I can't feel his mind reaching out to find me," 
    That could be absolutely hilarious! (not the intended goal though)
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Also, Dune is a political/religious/cultural allegory in the first place.
  • StormyKnightStormyKnight Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador
    T23- There's an article in the Wall Street Journal from May 18th this year in which producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse debunk some myths about how the show was written. Granted there isn't overwhelming info but I do believe they had at least a rough outline of how the show was to go- even if they had to create filler along the way due to the network not providing an end date. The episode with Paulo and Nicki was exquisite for a "filler" (and creeped the heck out of me at the same time) and I've recognized it as a filler from the get go, but some episodes I couldn't tell if it was filler or not. I suppose I would have to give credit to the writers for covering it up so well if that's the case.
    http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2014/03/18/lost-writers-debunk-theories-about-hit-series-10-years-later/
    From a Lost writer, Javier Grillo-Marxuach, from the first season: "Q: What do you think about “Lost”’s direction as a show since you left? A: The God’s honest truth is I really haven’t kept up with the show since I left. … I’m still very good friends with the writers of the show and with Damon, and I think that “Lost” is a massive animal that chews through story. But I think that … when we started on the show, J.J. and Damon … knew how they wanted the show to go, and we really worked very hard to create the underpinnings of that."
    I think the following is the best description of how I pictured Lost being created including validation on the continuity of the show's storyline:
    Q: “Lost” is a show of mysteries, and the fans parse every detail. Do the writers always know what everything is, and what it means, before throwing it into a storyline? Or do they allow themselves room for discovery as they go? A: To be honest, there’s a little bit of both. Damon was very rigorous, especially at the beginning, about saying, “We will not put anything on the screen that we don’t know what it is,” because we were beginning to realize just how rabid our fan following was. … We had a continuity czar … whose job is keeping track of everything. But at the same time, you drop little things that become useful later on. You don’t even think about them, and then, you think, “Oh, God, we just did this in episode 3; let’s bring it back in episode 8.” So again, it’s a combination of evolution and intuition and pre-planning.
    http://www.annarbor.com/entertainment/lost-former-writer/
    BSG jumped the shark the last season. I liked the last episode with its glimpse into the future at the end but the last season with the "final 5" and the inclusion of the Bob Dylan song never made any sense. I think someone just liked that version of the song and decided to throw it in for fun........at least that's how it came across to me. I think it was used to show the characters feel like they've been at the same point before- like the song came from a former life and keeps getting recycled or something.
    X-Files always seemed to drift so if they were trying to make it a true serial, they failed to convey it to me. Too many independent episodes between advancing the Mulder conspiracies side of the story. Take the independent stories out and you'd have a great serial story. That's where Star Treks DS9, Voyager and Enterprise failed as well. I loved the shows, don't get me wrong, but I think they allowed too many fan writers to get involved to where they were actually modifying scripts to 'make' them fit into the story arc- if they even had one. At one point Benjamin Sisko says, after a Dominion agent was revealed as a changeling, something like 'This means they could be anyone or anywhere' eluding to the shapeshifting capabilities of the Dominion. I felt a sense of doom at that point and they never capitalized on the idea. The episodes that followed never showed any paranoia (which would most certainly occur), business as usual and no real shapeshifting surprises. Big let down. They missed a great way to escalate the story to new levels of Trek story telling.
    Getting cancelled (wasn't it twice or did they just switch networks twice?) certainly didn't help B5 any. I always felt the Season 5 telepath story went on a little too long but it was a semi-interesting jaunt none-the-less. I do like hating Bester but it was the weakest part of the overall story.......well, that and their portrayal of a military in 'GROPOS'. Wow- that was some bad soldier acting, sorry. Ending season 4 with "Intersections in Real Time" would have been a great cliffhanger!
Sign In or Register to comment.