How to edit out orange gun tips?

HeySiriHeySiri Website User Posts: 382 Just Starting Out

So in a short film I'm making there are guns and for legal reasons we are keeping the tips orange during filming, planning to edit it in post. I got some test footage a few weeks ago and now that I'm finally playing with it I'm hitting a snag. My idea was to create a grade layer over the footage and then rotoscope a mask around the general area of the orange tip and chroma key out the orange. It worked, and replaced the area with black. But how can I change the colour of the tip to whatever I want now? It just stays as black no matter what I do.

Thanks!

Comments

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,281 Ambassador

    You're half on the right track. We'll assume you have a tight roto already. So, instead of replacing the tip  you just want to color correct, instead.

    You might want to look at some Ae tutorials on this, and just look at what color effects were used. Hue/Saturation/Lightness is probably a good one to start with  You'll pull most of the saturation out, adjust the Hue (depending on the paint used there will be a slight yellow or blue cast to the "black." You'll probably need to use Curves to get the brightness matched. 

  • HeySiriHeySiri Website User Posts: 382 Just Starting Out

    @Triem23 What I did instead of a grade layer was starting with my original footage: duplicate the layer. Then on the top layer create the mask around the orange tip. On the layer behind I apply all the effects to remove the orange. I've tried the chroma key and leave colour effects but I'm still left with an either black tip or a grey tip and I can control the remaining colour. How can I change the colour of what I'm cutting out?

    Note: my mask isn't strictly around the orange tip. It's just in the general area of the tip, so that any effect won't affect the environment.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,281 Ambassador

    You'd apply the color effects to the top copy with your tip. 

    I only know the theory on this, I've never done it. That's why I suggested some Ae tutorials. In general Hitfilm and Ae have mostly the same color effects. Otherwise reread my notes above on Hue/Saturation/Lightness. 

  • HeySiriHeySiri Website User Posts: 382 Just Starting Out

    I'm stilling having trouble. Once I've removed the orange colour, how can I change the colour to the exact shade of grey I want it to be.

  • PalaconoPalacono Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,442 Enthusiast

    The Fill Color effect?

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,281 Ambassador

    @Palacono that would destroy the lighting.

    @HeySiri this is a problematic question. There is no single one-stop fix for this  but various tools that work on different shots. 

    Curves, another Hue/Saturation/Lightness or Color Wheels should all do it.

    The bad news is you won't find a lot of Hitfilm specific tutorials on color matching with these tools. The good news is these tools are generic. Curves and Hue/Sat/Lit work exactly the same way Hitfilm as Ae, Vegas, Photoshop, etc. Color Wheels might have different names for options, but should have the same controls. So color matching tutorials for those tools will work the same way in Hitfilm as any other program. 

    The other thing you really need to learn (if you haven't) is additive color theory. In this case a screen/TV/monitor is lit in some way. "Black" is just the color of the actual screen material. The red/green/blue channels are literal levels of light emission. Red+Green=Yellow, Red+Blue=Purple, Green+Blue=Cyan. 

    So you have to train your eye and brain to think of color in those terms. To color correct the barrel, once it's desaturated it has to color to match. As I said before, blacks tend to skew red or blue. Being able to see which color needs to skew which way and which RGB channels affect the desired Hue is the key skill to color correcting - knowing if I need to push something a little orange means I take out a lot of blue and a little green. 

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