Using mask on Quad Wrap text

How can I mask a quad wrapped text so I can pass an object over the text and dissappear while the object is moving on it.
I have the idea the mask works on the original text, not on the quad wrapped text?

In my example, I have a text on the floor and a car riding over it. When the car is over the text, it should disappear.

Comments

  • FilmSensei
    FilmSensei Posts: 3,113 Expert
    edited March 2019

    I would make the animated masked text into a Composite Shot (Precompose it) and then apply the Quad Warp to that Text Comp within your Main Comp.

    Edit: You could also use a Grade Layer. You would animate the mask on the text itself and put the quad warp in the Grade Layer.

  • CuBic85
    CuBic85 Posts: 3

    Hello,

    Thanks for the reply.

    It's not realy the text thats animated and the car isnt realy moving. Its the camera that moves from left to right and when the car is over the text I want the thext to dissapear when the camera moves.

    I hope you understand me ;).

  • Triem23
    Triem23 Posts: 20,579 Ambassador

    Fun thing is it does not matter if the car is animated or a camera move. Animating the mask is the same either way. 

    You are correct in that the madk is applied before the effect. You could follow Sensei's suggestion, but I'd Quad Warp the text, select the text (and points if you used points  precomp the text (move effect) then mask the embedded comp shot. Embedding the comp "bakes in" the Quad Warp, so you can mask the warped text  

  • FilmSensei
    FilmSensei Posts: 3,113 Expert

    Actually, that makes more sense, because then you can dial in the animation of the mask more easily. Good point, Mike!

  • CuBic85
    CuBic85 Posts: 3

     Hello,

    First of all, thanks for the replies.

    I finally found some time to try this and it worked.

    I quad wrapped the text and put only the text in a comp. Then I made another comp with the text comp en video in it and then I was able to aply the mask to it like it should. Works like a charm :).

     

    Thanks

  • Triem23
    Triem23 Posts: 20,579 Ambassador

     No problem. 

    Ok, so I'm copy/pasting myself from another thread. Different question, same answer. This is pretty Essential information.

    'Make "NewPlane4" an embedded composite shot as described above when I said "If creating something procedural in Hitfilm this should be an embedded comp. "

    Pay attention to the rest of this post, because the Order of Operations discussion I'm about to star is going to apply to ANY and ALL Hitfilm effects that use a "Source Layer." A "Source Layer" might be called "Source Layer," or it might have other names, like "Timing Map." The bottom line is in any Hitfilm effect that links to a photo/video or plane layer, that's a "Source Layer."

    When an effect reads a Source Layer it reads the "Raw" state of the layer. This is the layer BEFORE any masks or other effects are applied.

    For a photo or video layer the "Raw" layer is the original pixel data. For a plane layer the "Raw" layer is a blank plane with whatever color was assigned.

    Remember a Raw layer is read BEFORE any effects are applied. Your New Plane 4 has a gradient on it. However, that's an effect and Shatter doesn't see it. Just the original plane.

    Embedding the plane in a composite shot "bakes in" the effect. The "Raw" state of an embedded composite shot is a render of the entire comp.

    A GRADE Layer forces a render of all layers below itself - the "Raw" state of a Grade Layer is the render of every layer below... (This is why the effects on a Grade Layer "affect" everything below it. It's not affecting ANYTHING below itself, it's actually rendering everything below then applying effects to itself. This is also why masking a Grade Layer "chokes" the effect.

    Another good Order of Operations tip. Layers are calculated and rendered from bottom to top. Individual layers are rendered top to bottom: so, for photo/video/plane/model/particle layers the order is Masks, then Effects, the Transforms. This is why a masked plane with a glow on it has the glow extend outside the mask. A GRADE Layer goes in the order of Transform, Effects, Masks, so masking a Grade LAyer cuts off it's effects. (Note: at some point the devs changed the interface. Masks literally used to be BELOW Effects in the interface, which made order of operations clear. Now Masks are shown ABOVE effects. I assume this was so the interface would look consistent across all layer types, but it does make it harder to remember order of operations.)

    Remembering this order of operations is pretty important, since it's going to come up a lot. here you seem to have tripped yourself up on Order of Operations. Converting your gradient to an embedded comp should fix the issue. Alternately, you could keep the gradient in the same layer, but move it to the bottom of the stack, put a grade layer over it and use the grade as the timing map. This all depends on what your background layer may be. The important thing is, for many effects - especially anything procedural on a plane - you must "bake in" the effects before the layer can be used as a source layer. Whether to bake in via embedded comp shot or "Grade Layer Trick" depends on the individual user and/or the individual shot. I tend towards embedded comps."