Hitfilm Express Version 9.0.7813.7206 does not want to import Native 4k video that is in an .MOV

I have been using Hitfilm express for about 5 months and I recently got a new camera that shoots Native 4k, but when I try to import it on my PC Hitfilm says "invalid"

My Hitfilm Express Version is 9.0.7813.7206

The video format is .MOV

The codec is H.265

Comments

  • NormanPCNNormanPCN Website User Posts: 3,950 Enthusiast
    edited August 2018

    The H.265 video codec is not supported by Hitfilm. You will have to transcode it to a supported format. Cineform is a good option.

    Also, you really do not want to try and edit HEVC/H.265 video. It has very high overhead.

    The user guide lists the formats supported by Hitfilm. 

    https://www.manula.com/manuals/fxhome/hitfilm-pro/9/en/topic/supported-formats

    https://fxhome.com/forum/discussion/42349/transcoding-for-better-performance-and-easier-editing

     

  • CleverTaglineCleverTagline Moderator Las Vegas, NVModerator, Website User, Ambassador, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,042 Ambassador
    edited August 2018

    Edit: DOH! I had a hunch someone would beat me to it.  :)

  • Dan1508Dan1508 Website User Posts: 8

    Beat you to what... The Native 4k?

  • Dan1508Dan1508 Website User Posts: 8

    @NormanPCN What did you mean by do not want to try and edit HEVC/H.264 video. Can I still import it in H.264 codec?

  • NormanPCNNormanPCN Website User Posts: 3,950 Enthusiast

    @Dan1508 "What did you mean by do not want to try and edit HEVC/H.264 video."

    "It has very high overhead."

    I'll enhance that quote as follows. It has very high decode/decompress overhead. That commonly leads to a poor editing experience with stuttery playback.

    I also fixed my typo from HEVC/H.264 to HEVC/H.265. AVC and H.264 are the same thing. One is an ISO spec and the other is ITU. Likewise, HEVC and H.265 are the same thing. ISO and ITU specs respectively.

    AVC/H.264 is supported by Hitfilm. Even that may not edit smoothly depending on the exact specs of the media encode and the speed of your PC.

  • CleverTaglineCleverTagline Moderator Las Vegas, NVModerator, Website User, Ambassador, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,042 Ambassador

    @Dan1508 Norman beat me to the comment that H.265 isn't supported by HitFilm. I originally posted the same thing, but when I refreshed the thread, I saw that his reply came in before mine, so I edited my post so there weren't two nearly-identical comments back to back.

  • Dan1508Dan1508 Website User Posts: 8

    @jsbarrett wow that sucks they should add that in the next version. Until then can anyone help me with editing 4k video in hitfilm express

  • CleverTaglineCleverTagline Moderator Las Vegas, NVModerator, Website User, Ambassador, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,042 Ambassador

    @Dan1508 It's not likely that H.265 support will appear. Short answer: it's an expensive license, plus the overhead that @NormanPCN mentioned. This thread gives more details:

    https://fxhome.com/forum/discussion/42620/is-h265-still-not-supported-by-hitfilm

    As for editing what you've got, you can transcode it to a more efficient format/codec combo.  The second link that Norman posted above has details about that.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,303 Ambassador

    To expand on what @NormanPCN writes.

    Long story short - H.264/mp4 video is slower for a computer to work with because it's highly compressed. Hitfilm has to decompress a video frame to work with it, and the more compressed the video is the longer it takes to decompress. Generally in video there's a trade-off between file size and quality/responsiveness. We usually recommend working in Cineform on Windows machines. The files sizes will be much larger than mp4, but it will edit much faster in Hitfilm.

    h.265/HVEC compresses roughly twice as much as h.264 and is harder for your computer to decode. Doesn't matter because Hitfilm doesn't support h.265. Why? It's a licensed codec and, as commercial software, Hitfilm would have to pay for it. This would substantially raise the cost of Hitfilm Pro and the Codecs add-on. The license group that owns HVEC charges something like 4 times the amount they used to charge for mp4. The license cost is actually why most commercial NLEs didn't support the codec for the first three years it existed!

    Anyways, converting your footage to an "editing" format will give you a more enjoyable edit experience.

    This video goes into a bit more detail about how video compression works, and discusses several (free) methods to convert from one format to another. This video should probably be updated soon to cover changes to Hitfilm itself, and to add in VirtualDub as a tool.

  • PalaconoPalacono Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,442 Enthusiast
    edited August 2018

    @Triem23 you could also be specific about which Cineform format to use. I found that all the 4:2:0 and even the 4:2:2 versions really, really didn't like patches of red against a grey background and smeared it horribly into large chunky chroma artifacts edit: at all qualities up to Filmscan 2. Only 4:4:4 worked properly, even though it was transcoding from a 4:2:0 source in the first place - which incidentally looked fine. The final exported 4:2:0 output also looked like the original 4:2:0, or the 4:4:4 intermediate, i.e. no smeared reds, so....weird.

  • NormanPCNNormanPCN Website User Posts: 3,950 Enthusiast

    There is no 4:2:0 Cineform. Only 422 and RGB(A).

  • PalaconoPalacono Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 3,442 Enthusiast

    @NormanPCN Doh!  I meant I was playing with YUV 4:2:2 and RGB 4:4:4 and RGBA 4:4:4:4 from a 4:2:0 MP4 file and to a 4:2:0 MP4 file.

    All versions of 4:2:2 up to Filmscan 2 smeared the reds - so they looked worse than the original 4:2:0, even though the files were enormous - whereas as low as Medium 4:4:4 worked just fine, so just don't use 4:4:2.

  • DreamArchitectDreamArchitect Website User Posts: 595 Enthusiast

    I've noticed that people that used to recommend the avid codecs as intermediates now seem to be recommending cineform instead. Is there a reason for that?

    If it's better where can I get hold of it and what software supports it. There doesn't seem to be a single location for it.

     

  • NormanPCNNormanPCN Website User Posts: 3,950 Enthusiast

    "Is there a reason for that?"

    Yes, Cineform is native in Hitfilm. No need to install anything. Cineform is also native in other major editors like Premiere and Resolve. Avid codecs require you to install Quicktime codecs and therefore require you to use Quicktime.

    Cineform in Hitfilm just performs better than any other intermediate. Prores is native in Hitfilm and it should perform similar. Excluding viewer half/quarter res playback. In that Cineform is king.

    You can use Hitfilm to transcode to Cineform. As for other tools that gets tricky. VirtualDub would probably be the best current option.

  • Dan1508Dan1508 Website User Posts: 8

    How do I install the Cineform codec

  • NormanPCNNormanPCN Website User Posts: 3,950 Enthusiast

    "How do I install the Cineform codec"

    "Cineform is native in Hitfilm. No need to install anything. Cineform is also native in other major editors like Premiere and Resolve."

  • Dan1508Dan1508 Website User Posts: 8

    Is there a video that will help me understand cineform better?

  • Stargazer54Stargazer54 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador

    I dunno @Dan1508. Perhaps do some research maybe? 

    I got a butt load of responses by Googling "cineform codec videos".

    Suffice it to say that Cineform is a good intermediate codec for editing with HF.  As as been stated by @NormanPCN, you can use HF to do the conversion for you.  Drop your footage on the timeline, go to the Export tab and select Cineform as the output codec preset..  Once all your footage is converted, start a new project and import the converted Cineform footage as media and edit away.

  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,303 Ambassador

    @Dan1508 Specifically on Cineform? Not that I'm aware of.

    You shouldn't need a tutorial specifically on that codec. Codec=COmpressor/DECompressor and refers to any algorithm for packing/unpacking video data into a file. Differences between codecs are often highly technical and obscure.

    The first 10 min or so of this video discusses, briefly, the differences between "Editing" and "Delievery" codecs.

    The super short version is a "delivery codec" crams data as tight as possible to use fewer resources while storing or streaming files. The high data compression requires more computer resources to decode. For simple playback, this isn't a big deal. For NLE's where every frame needs to be easily editable, this causes slowdown. "Editing codecs" use lower compression. Much larger files but a lot easier for a computer to decode and encode a frame.

    Cineform is an editing codec.

    That's really all you need to know.

    Cineform has a lot of "Quality Settings." Low, Medium, High, Filmscan 1, Filmscan 2. "Medium" will be (more than) good enough for any footage originally shot off a DSLR/MFT/Phone/GoPro. High and Filmscan settings are for cinema cameras where the original footage was already some sort of RAW or high-bit depth source

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