Using "Pictures" instead of "Films"

AmbiroaAmbiroa Website User Posts: 180 Just Starting Out
edited August 2013 in General
I noticed that many film production companies use "Pictures" instead of "Films"? Why is that? I never paid attention to it but now that I am playing with video myself and active on here, might as well ask you.
- Columbia Pictures, Walt Disney Pictures, Paramount Pictures, etc.
- vs. Screen Gems, Dimension Films, Pixar Animation Studios, Lionsgate Entertainment, etc.

Comments

  • jobodhobojobodhobo Website User Posts: 49
    In England films  used to be referred to as the pictures, this because of old school film which was made up of lots of pictures. That may be it but I'm not sure.
  • AmbiroaAmbiroa Website User Posts: 180 Just Starting Out
    In England films  used to be referred to as the pictures, this because of old school film which was made up of lots of pictures. That may be it but I'm not sure.


    Its a valid point. If you look at Universal, their production company is called Universal Pictures, with the studios named Universal Studios. But both in their intro title and in common conversation its called Universal. One would expect that corps like that would have no problems updating their names. The 'fresh" one in all this to me is Sony Pictures Imageworks, with of course the Imageworks label that sounds and looks unique.

  • RobinRobin Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 1,671 Enthusiast
    Films are also often called "motion pictures", because, well, that's essentially what they are. Moving pictures.
  • AmbiroaAmbiroa Website User Posts: 180 Just Starting Out
    Films are also often called "motion pictures", because, well, that's essentially what they are. Moving pictures.

     Uhuh...I know. But why do you think of them using "Pictures" instead "Films"?
    - Columbia Films, Walt Disney Films, Paramount Films;
    Sounds awkward for some reason hahaha

  • RobinRobin Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 1,671 Enthusiast
    Haha no idea  :D
  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
     I guess it comes down to personal preferences for the "naming of names" process, the same way that - for example - music production companies have been known to use words like "Music", "Songs", "Tunes", "Tracks" etc in their names. Probably no critical reason for choosing one over the other except for it being something they liked at the time.  :) 
  • AmbiroaAmbiroa Website User Posts: 180 Just Starting Out
    Hahaha yeah sorry. I have my moments. From time to time I tend to question myself about stuff completely nonense, although this one is quite relevant for this forum  ;) 
    I looked up in the dictionary and noticed that picture has more meanings related to images and visuals, and film more meanings related to biology and chemistry. Theoretically pictures would be logical to choose if it sounds better.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,254 Ambassador
    Pretty sure it goes back to the birth of the studio system. I mean most of the majors started in So-Cal all within a couple of years of each other, and, at that point, the term "Motion Picture" was in very common use, as opposed to "Film" which just refers to the capture media.
    Besides, in these days of digital video capture and CGI and the impending death of actual FILM, I think "Pictures" is going to end up being more timeless. ;)
  • NullUnitNullUnit Website User Posts: 791 Just Starting Out
    I use Pictures because it sounds more old timey, which I like. Its kind of an antiquated term. 
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    I don't think motion pictures started becoming commonly called "films" until the advent of video, at which point it became necessary to make a distinction.  When those studios were started, early in the 20th century, the term "film" in reference to a motion picture was not commonly used.
  • Triem23Triem23 Moderator Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 18,254 Ambassador
    I think you're right.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    Hehe, I overlooked your earlier post, Triem23, where you pretty much said the same thing as me.  Sorry about that.  At least we are in agreement.
  • StormyKnightStormyKnight Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador
    edited August 2013
    Pictures used to be taken with film so I don't think it matters what you call them- movies, motion pictures, films, animations.....personally, pictoids is my favorite term. It sounds futuristic. :P
    ok- I just made that up.
    Besides, with film, you need a special kind of detergent to get it off. Wait- what was the question? People still say they're going to 'film' something when using a digital camera, (that doesn't make sense to me) or they say they are going to shoot some video or tape a tv show when using a DVR. I think we're reaching a point where it's just understood no matter how you say, name it or do it, it all means generally the same thing.
    Regardless, it all started trying to see if a horse has all four feet off the ground while galloping. If it wasn't for that nonsense we wouldn't be to this point in movies today.
    Just for the sake of the topic and to pay homage: here is the first "motion picture":
    http://youtu.be/5taGClULpqA

    Nonsense? Yup. Sorry, CB. 
  • rgbiirgbii Website User Posts: 965 Just Starting Out
    I think picture or motion pictures is just as relevant as the word film, since most of the films you watch were not shot as film, but as video.  Even something shot on a RED doesn't even start out as a digital film, it's a sequence of individual raw pictures, so in some cases, pictures is more accurate than film.
    I'm sticking with the word film, even though I haven't used real film in years :)
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    edited August 2013
    And, of course, the word 'movie' emerged as a slang/shorthand for 'motion picture'. When you stop to consider the word 'movie', you realise it is an utterly, utterly silly word. It'd be like calling photographs 'stillies'.
    As others have pointed out, 'motion picture' is probably still the most accurate way to describe this particular medium.
Sign In or Register to comment.