DVD's too loud? (Adobe Encore)

MatthiasClaflinMatthiasClaflin Website User Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
Since Adobe went to a subscription pay model, I've switched over. I have been working as a videographer at a summer camp for the past four weeks. I placed one of my DVD's into my DVD player at home this past weekend, immediately after watching the new(ish) A-Team movie. When my DVD began the volume was considerably louder than that of the previously played (professionally created) DVD. Not to mention the audio for the menu was considerable louder than for the video, however they were both compressed into the same file format and both were set to be (at their peaks) at -1db (to avoid any peaking). I am a bit confused as to why this is. If anyone has any insight on why this occurs or how to set these levels manually, it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
Have a wonderful day/night!
-Matthias Claflin

Comments

  • NuttyBananaNuttyBanana Website User Posts: 151
    I'd say your way is probably better for what you're doing anyway.  The thing I find with Blu-Rays at the minute is that the 'speaking' audio is quite low, and then the action set pieces and music are really loud.  It's actually a little distracting from the film.
    I think what you're doing is probably fine and you can always turn the volume down on the TV :)
  • TomMcTomMc Website User Posts: 112 Just Starting Out
    I'm not sure exactly, but as a point of reference, I have always been taught to set the volume levels at -6db for professional media delivery.
  • StormyKnightStormyKnight Moderator, Website User, Ambassador, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 2,726 Ambassador
    I'd say your way is probably better for what you're doing anyway.  The thing I find with Blu-Rays at the minute is that the 'speaking' audio is quite low, and then the action set pieces and music are really loud.  It's actually a little distracting from the film.
    I think what you're doing is probably fine and you can always turn the volume down on the TV :)

     

    It isn't the Blu-Rays, it's all movies in the last 20 years or so. It's been a complaint of mine for a loooooong time. Even with a feature that's supposed to level the volume out on my amplifier the action and music sequences are still louder. Same happens on my DVR, movies on cable and pay-per-view. I don't understand why they don't fix it. The only thing I can think is it's cheaper to design the audio for theaters rather than both theaters and digital media.(?) @-)
  • NuttyBananaNuttyBanana Website User Posts: 151
    Yeh I'm the same, knock the bass right down and the treble up to bring the voices out more and I still end up with the blasting in action pieces. Fortunately our neighbour is verging on deaf anyway, but it's a pain trying to watch a movie when the kids are in bed.  I like the audio nice a loud, but they're often too loud for even me, and it gives my wife a headache lol.  I must admit that I only started noticing it with Blu-Rays though a few years back so I dunno.
  • MatthiasClaflinMatthiasClaflin Website User Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
    Hey thanks TomMc. I will keep everything at -6db from now on then.
    Another question: I am under the impression that there are ways of getting dialogue to "pop" out when you have music in the background without just making it louder. What are some ways of doing this? I haven't had much sound experience but I assume some messing with an EQ could help?
  • Kyre PetersKyre Peters Website User Posts: 21
    I'm sure there's much better ways for doing this with video, but I personally just use the same concept as for when I'm mixing a song. Make sure the frequencies of the said instruments (in this case the song) aren't masking out the frequencies of the lyrics (this case the dialog). If ya know, or even if you don't, when too many of the same frequencies are heard together it creates a really muddy sound. Not sure what you are editing your audio in, but regardless I'm sure you have a multi-band EQ in there somewhere. You could find the main range of frequencies of the dialog (if you have a frequency analyzer on the EQ just press "analyze" and there will be waves moving up and down on the frequency range when said track is playing) toss the Multi-Band EQ over the song and reduce those frequencies on the song to make your dialog stand out.  Hope that info is helpful, and if not then just my 2-cents! :D
    You could also try panning the song hard left or right to avoid it playing in the center with the dialog, unless you're editing in surround, in which case you have more options where to place the audio, but the main task is to get different frequency ranges in different tracks, speakers, etc.
    ALSO, not to sound like a smart ass or w/e, but if you don't want to turn the dialog up, could you turn the music down? like more of an ambiance? 
  • MatthiasClaflinMatthiasClaflin Website User Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
    edited July 2013
    Thanks. I use Adobe Audition, sorry for not mentioning that earlier. I appreciate the feedback! :)
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