Total Recall Beginning Fight Scene At Recall Center

ViktoriousViktorious Website User Posts: 105
Hey guys, I am trying to do a shot very similar to this one.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=LdIL1Jyswkw#t=0s
My film is a medieval film so we will be fighting with swords but with not as many soldiers to fight. Basically I'm wondering how this can be accomplished? My first thought was to have the camera go around the actors as they fought in slow motion. And then just speed up the footage later.
Any thoughts?...

Comments

  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
    edited December 2012
    Seems like a combination of various methods going on there, but with a sizable amount of the perceived action speed actually being imparted by the go-stop-turn-go swooping camera motions itself? Maybe it's just my eyes, but I'm not seeing much happening in the way of speed-ramping or anything with the motion of the actors themselves, as much as with the motion of the camera.
  • guitar74guitar74 Website User Posts: 506
    On the trailer I found I would like to know what sound this is at 1:04 to 1:07, it is a bass sound, I heard it in a lot of movies.
    Now there was no speed ups I can tell, it is how the camera is moving around and to the actors. It would be hard to pull off without the proper equiptment.
  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
    edited December 2012
    That quick little descending bass tone around 1:07 sounds like a pretty simple synth or synth-drum sound, with a low starting tone and then a pitch envelope (or simply a synth's pitchbend wheel) making it bend downwards like that.
  • BryanAllanKraussBryanAllanKrauss Website User Posts: 21
    Some thoughts.
    This is some complex cinematic motion. The camera motion would most likely be done with a crane. Including the push. pull, pan and tilt movements. The edit done with multiple cuts. I would assume that every time the camera passes behind one of the security guards or a post that would be a cut.
    Some other films that have used this similar technique would be the ROPE Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It uses slow long cuts to gives the whole film the feeling of one take. When in fact the length of the cuts where based on how much 35MM film could be loaded onto the camera.
    Another film that uses this similar technique is STRANGE DAYS a James Cameron produced film. In the intro of this film. It looks like one long take. When in fact it is shot in multiple locations, and the use of a editing technique cutting on the whip pan.
    There is also a long take in the film CHILDREN OF MEN. This is also done with multiple takes, with match moving to tie it all together.
    I would say the fundamentals of these films are very similar. Other then the amount of time it is done in.
    Here are few book recommendations to help your progress with Cinematography.
    Cinematic Motion by Steven d. Katz
    Setting Up your shots By Jeremy Vineyard
    The Invisible Cut By Bobbie O'Steen
    They should be available at any Public Library, if you can't afford them.
    Why I included an editing book on that list, is real simple film philosophy. Knowing how your going to cut it together, will force you to shot it a certain way that you know will work when cut together. Hence, Shoot for the edit. It will save you a lot of headache in the long run.
    I hope this helps.
    If there are any questions. Please feel free to ask.
  • ernesttxernesttx Website User Posts: 32
    Good article on the making of and that one fight scene at http://www.fxguide.com/featured/keeping-it-real-total-recall/
    Explains that they used multiple slide tracks and such.
  • BryanAllanKraussBryanAllanKrauss Website User Posts: 21
    @ernesttx
    Thank you for the article, that helps clear things up. FX Guide looks like a lot of valuable reading.
    Having read the one shot portion of the article you provided. It becomes baffling when you think of how much money is spent on just one shot. They said it was three to four days, just to do the clean up shots.
  • guitar74guitar74 Website User Posts: 506

    That quick little descending bass tone around 1:07 sounds like a pretty simple synth or synth-drum sound, with a low starting tone and then a pitch envelope (or simply a synth's pitchbend wheel) making it bend downwards like that.
    I heard that same sound in many movie trailers, like prometheus and a few others. I was hoping someone knew where to get it, since it is used very widely in movies now. I'm thinking it is a sound effect already made and a company sells it to these studios. Let me know anyone that can help with it. Thanks
  • ThelurkerishThelurkerish Website User Posts: 141

    @ernesttx
    Thank you for the article, that helps clear things up. FX Guide looks like a lot of valuable reading.
    Having read the one shot portion of the article you provided. It becomes baffling when you think of how much money is spent on just one shot. They said it was three to four days, just to do the clean up shots.
    IID likke to thank @erenesttx for that the link to that article as well
    Ive really enjoyed reading this thread and I agree with your observation about the money that went into this shot and its a crying shame that all skill and technique has been buried in a film which seems like another pointless remake
  • ernesttxernesttx Website User Posts: 32
    You guys are welcome. Just got lucky I remembered that fxguide covered that shot in that article.
  • MichaelJamesMichaelJames Website User Posts: 2,038 Enthusiast
    I'd love a FX guide to the original Total Recall
  • LinkedPicturesLinkedPictures Website User Posts: 150
    That's quite odd, I just read all about that shot in my CGI magazine. What a coincidence...
  • ViktoriousViktorious Website User Posts: 105
    Thanks everyone for that. Now lets say you were going to do a shot like that with only a shoulder rig... How would you do it?
    I was thinking just have my actors do their stuff in slow mo while I walk around them with the rig. Afcoarse this would be multiple takes but I think I could get the camera steady enough and then speed up the footage in ae as well as stabilize it a little.
  • ESPicturesESPictures Website User Posts: 533 Just Starting Out
    I would test it out before getting actors in there. Set up some cardboard cutouts that you could use in place of actors. Lay down some tape of the ground to mark exactly where you plan to walk with the camera. And then have one other person guide you along the tape while you run the camera.
    But my guess is that it'd never look as good as a dolly system.
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