Can you recommend a microphone ?

luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
I want to try doing a video tutorial but my current mic is a very cheap ($10) PC one. I think I might require a USB condenser mic from what I have researched. My budget is up to about $60
Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

Comments

  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Look at anything by Blue. They have a range of USB mics which are quite nice. Some are quite expensive, but if you look at the lower end, like the Snowball or the Snowflake, they should suit your needs nicely. I currently use the Yeti for all the tutorials I do, which is a slightly more expensive option from Blue.
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/413696-REG/Blue_SNOWBALL_BUNDLE_TW_Snowball_USB_Condenser_Microphone.html
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
    Hi Axel
    Thank you for responding. It's funny you should recommend Blue mics as that's the brand I'd seen mentioned on some google searches. I'd never heard of them but the Snowball looks interesting - in a retro way. I'd say it's within my budget. How is the Yeti better (out of interest) ?
    Cheers
  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
    edited November 2012
    +1 on the Blue mikes. Very highly regarded.
    Another option: while I use their M179 condenser mike with a tube preamp for voiceover work as well as singing, instrument miking etc and not any of their USB ones, CAD also makes some excellent quality affordable mikes too. I don't know anything about this USB one of theirs but seems to have good reviews and is within your price range:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/579415-REG/CAD_U37_U37_USB_Studio_Condenser.html
    A lot of people like AKG's USB mikes as well, though that would go a bit above your target price range.
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
    edited November 2012
    Hi Har,
    that CAD mic looks real good, is it constructed from metal or plastic ?
  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
    Hmmm, not sure as I don't own that one myself - the M179 I have is metal, but is a different beast entirely so can't assume the same for this one.
    Oddly, their own website doesn't seem to explain either:
    http://www.cadaudio.com/USB_U37.php
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    edited November 2012
    I'd say the main differences between the Snowball and the Yeti are A) that the yeti is all metal, and B) it gives you a bit more control. Also, the Yeti is a little bit taller, which was useful based on my height and my desk. The Snowball is nice, and I used one for some time before I had to give it back to its rightful owner, at which point I got the Yeti for my own use.
    I once had a set of CAD mics for recording my drums, and they were awful. Cheaply built, and the sound quality was quite poor. But, that was some time ago, and I've never used their USB mics, so maybe that one works well.
    Both Blue mics I've tried worked well. Every Shure mic I've used was excellent. I've got 3 M-Audio mics which are all great. I've tried 7 CAD mics which were all unacceptable. Based on that I tend to avoid CAD, but I'm sure there are other people out there, and other mics they make, which are working out well.
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
    Thanks guys, BTW Axel, the Yeti is stereo but the Snowball is mono (apparently)
    Looks like I'll be getting a Snowball as I havn't seen a single bad review
    Cheers
  • HarHar Website User Posts: 400 Just Starting Out
    edited November 2012
    Axel: yeah, I believe there had been a period of time where CAD's stuff was pretty poorly made which I'm guessing was probably when you tried them. Their build quality is much better now (or at least, the ones I own and have used...we all know how changeable these things can be over time. ;) ....and again to be fair: I've never tried or needed their USB mikes)
    luxgud: general rule of thumb for all such things is of course to try them out if at all possible for individual needs and purposes - opinions of mike quality like everything else is very much a Your Mileage May Vary™ kind of thing and one person's perfect sounding mike could flat out suck for someone else (and online flamewars about the topic abound :))) . Or if you can't try it out beforehand, at least purchase from somewhere with an easy return policy if it doesn't work for you. All that said, the Blue mikes will likely be an excellent choice. :)
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
  • MichaelJamesMichaelJames Website User Posts: 2,038 Enthusiast
    Blue just had this mic on amazon for a daily lightning deal. It was nice.
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
    Eventually I purchased a Blue Snowball (the cheaper one that doesn't have the switch at the back - didn't need omni-pattern behaviour or a -10dB pad)
    Thank you for all the helpful suggestions.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Awesome, I'm sure it wil work out well for you.
  • MichaelJamesMichaelJames Website User Posts: 2,038 Enthusiast
    Any recommendations for a low budget/decent quality shotgun mic.
  • luxgudluxgud Website User Posts: 128
    edited April 2013
    The sound quality is smooth and full with no audible background noise. You have to speak quite close to the mic. however.
    My only issue is that it is sooooo large and bulky. I'd prefer a more traditional build rather than its spherical case but I can definitely recommend it.
  • XayberOptixXayberOptix Website User Posts: 7
    I vote for mics made by Blue too!  They sound quite nice.  Oh yea, if you want to make your recordings sound very professional, don't forget to use a pop filter as it lessens a lot of the "p" sounds that sometimes causes signal clipping.  :)  Happy editing!
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