overlaping clones and cloning with a moving camera

I've been cloning myself in hitfilm using masking to overlay multiple videos, it works fine, but I cant figure out any way to overlap clones or to make the effect work with a moving camera. Is there any describable way to solve these problems?

Comments

  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Keep the shots really wide, sot he change in perspective on each clone is minimal. If you are up close, then you have to exactly match the camera move for each clone, which will be very, very difficult without a motion control rig, which is crazy expensive. Overlapping clones should be fairly easy if you use a greenscreen; If you want to do that using split-screen/masking, then you have to meticulously draw the masks exactly to the edge of the clone to get it to work. Greenscreen makes it automatic and almost effortless. But still, trying to use a moving camera with multiple clones and not using motion control will be very difficult, depending on how the camera needs to move.
    The less the perspective on each clone changes, the easier it will be. Pushing straight in toward them from a distance, not too difficult, as you could animate things in post to get that aligned properly. but if you are trying to rotate around them, even a little, or pan past them from one side to the other, you need to match the camera move exactly each time for it to really work. So either bust out some ninja camera skills and repeat the exat same camera move, with the same timing, over and over, or get a motion control rig, or change the camera move to one you can pull off.
  • fredclipsfredclips Website User Posts: 228
    Everything that Axel said!
    This scene from Girl Fight 3: The Clones turned out to be tricky as hell to do!
    The bit where the clone with the box turned around she moved over the sword holding clone. Only a tiny bit! But it was a pain to correct. As Axel suggested, the only way to fix it was to mask frame by frame around the 'front' clone. I'm lucky it was such a short cross over. I'd hate to have to do larger, longer scene like this.
    Using a green screen on the front clone would have been the best. (I do wish I had thought of that at the time!)
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Also, what kind of moving camera do you mean? A fully roving free motion camera, or a static camera that is panning without moving?
  • MasterWolfMasterWolf Website User Posts: 369
    a static camera that is panning with out moving? ow that made my brain hurt. I think I know what you meant, but that description was just ow.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Panning is rotating in place, yeah? The camera isn't going anywhere, its staying put and turning.
  • MasterWolfMasterWolf Website User Posts: 369
    I tend to think of a static camera as one that is not moving at all, locked down on a tripod, no pan, no tilt. When I put "static camera shot" into my shooting notes, that is what I mean.
    I get what Simon meant, it was just not how I am used to the term Static Camera being used. Just gave me a moment of the old gears grinding to a halt for a sec.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    edited August 2012
    Yeah, I understand what you mean. Rotating could be considered moving, and therefore the camera isn't static. But in terms of matchmoving, whether via tracking or motion control, a free moving camera and a panning camera which stays in one place are very different beasts.
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    Sorry, probably bad phrasing on my part. :P
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