Looking to upgrade my computer... (Processor questions)

MatthiasClaflin
MatthiasClaflin Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
edited June 2012 in General
So I've got some question before I start buying upgrades for my computer as I prepare to get Hitfilm.
Question 1
If I buy a new processor (Intel), to replace my old one (also Intel), how do I know if it will be compatible with on my motherboard?
Question 2
I currently have a Intel Q6700 quad core processor. If I buy an i3/i5 dual core, will that be a downgrade? Would an i5 quad core be worth upgrading to?
Question 3
Does my processor even need upgrading?

Comments

  • OrangePekoe
    OrangePekoe Posts: 478

    So I've got some question before I start buying upgrades for my computer as I prepare to get Hitfilm.
    Question 1
    If I buy a new processor (Intel), to replace my old one (also Intel), how do I know if it will be compatible with on my motherboard?
    Question 2
    I currently have a Intel Q6700 quad core processor. If I buy an i3/i5 dual core, will that be a downgrade? Would an i5 quad core be worth upgrading to?
    Question 3
    Does my processor even need upgrading?
    1: In order to determine if a CPU will be compatible with your motherboard - determine the CPU socket type the motherboard is using or since you already have a working CPU you can determine that CPU's socket type and work the other way. In your case you have a Q6700 quad core processor which is a LGA755 socket type. Therefore your motherboard would be the same.
    2: The new ivy bridge i5 quad cores will definitely be faster than a Q6700. Hitfilm is multi core aware so having the extra cores will definitely be an advantage vs going with a dual core. Unfortunately, the new i5's use a different socket type LGA1155 which wouldn't be compatible with your motherboard. Therefore you would likely need a new motherboard, cpu and possibly ram.
    3: That's totally up to you, if you feel you need extra speed then upgrading different components is a good buy. If you aren't going to use the extra speed then it's definitely not worth it. As others have said, make sure you have a balanced system and since Hitfilm is fairly GPU intensive, the video card should probably be your first area to look if you haven't done so already. If you have Win7 (possibly vista can't remember) you can run the Windows experience index to see where your scores are the lowest and work on upgrading those areas first.
    Hope that helps! Good luck :)
  • InTheFlesh
    InTheFlesh Posts: 143
    1. Compatibility is all down to the socket the CPU is made with. The socket of your current CPU is LGA775 and the socket for the i3/i5/i7 is LGA 1155 for the Sandy Bridge revision (or LGA2011 for i7 Sandy Bridge-E). So a motherboard upgrade will be necessary.
    2. There a quite a few options for the i5, but even comparing the low end Sandy Bridge i5 to your current CPU shows pretty significant gains. From the PassMark CPU benchmark website, the Q6700 scores 3,356 points, while the i5 2300 scores 5,647 (the higher the better). I wouldn't even bother looking at the dual core Sandy Bridge i5 processors, you will be much better off with a quad core.
    3. Honestly, only if you feel the need. Do you do anything really processor intensive on your computer? That is really where the speed matters, and even then only really in multi-threaded applications.
    Sure, you will notice speed increases by going to the i5, but it's only worth it if you will get enough use out of it. In saying that, I believe HitFilm will make use of the extra processing power so depending how involved and complex you are planning to get with the software, an upgrade may indeed be worth it.
    Best bang for your buck currently though is still the i7 2600/K. 4 physical cores/8 hyper-threaded and in the case of the 2600K, you have an unlocked processor allowing over clocking.
  • MatthiasClaflin
    MatthiasClaflin Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
    edited June 2012
    I currently have a GeForce 8600 GT and I have not had a problem running the HitFilm Demo as of now.
    I have 4GB of DDR3 ram as well.
    I will be using hitfilm purely for static chroma key shots. Would an upgrade be necessary?
  • OrangePekoe
    OrangePekoe Posts: 478
    If you're happy with your computers current performance doing what you will be doing with the full version of Hitfilm then I don't see any reason to upgrade unless you want it to be faster. If you find out later down the road when you start using different parts of Hitfilm that the computer doesn't seem up to your standards then you can upgrade at that time.
    Based on your current specs though the 8600 GT doesn't appear to be on the minimum requirements list so you may or may not have issues with different parts of Hitfilm. However, as you mentioned, the things you've tried in the demo that you'll be doing in the Full version have been trouble free so this wouldn't be an issue.
    Upgrading is a personal choice if you feel you need more speed to do the things you want it to do. If it does what you want it to do currently and don't need performance gains then don't worry about upgrading.
    Overall, upgrading your system in a balanced fashion with a focus on your GPU will increase your systems performance in both real-time and export rendering.
    As mentioned by InTheFlesh, if you're going to use the power increase from upgrading, then upgrading is a very worth while expense.
  • MichaelJames
    MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast
    If you have a q6700 then your pc should be compatible with the QX6800. I originally had a e series processor and then switched to the q6600, and then wanted the most i could get and found that the QX6800 would work.
  • MichaelJames
    MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast
    For benchmark list of processors
    http://www.cpubenchmark.net/[email protected]+2.93GHz
    Is the QX6800 anything major compared to newer processors? No not even slightly. Is it a slouch either? No. Through 8 gigs of ram, a EVGA 560 ti sc and the QX6800 my pc is rated 7's all across the board except by way of the harddrive.
    There is 2 schools of thought when upgrading your computer. Build to the best thing or max out what you have. I make decent money but I wanted the cheapest method to get a better performance so I'm going to max my machine out. I have a dell XPS 410 and most dells are typically hard to upgrade but it turns out the XPS 410 was one of those rare machines where it was easy. Everything except the mobo could be upgraded, unless i can find a batx. Right now I am considering building a machine that is compatible with most of the parts that I currently have. I was looking at a mobo by EVGA which is nothing special from my new system except SLI compatible. At that point I would dump all the parts from my current system in and get a second GPU.
  • MatthiasClaflin
    MatthiasClaflin Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
    I decided to leave my computer alone as it did everything I needed it to. Now, with the Christmas season fast approaching, I was looking to upgrade my computer from the ground up, starting with my motherboard and cpu.
    My case will house an ATX motherboard, so finding one to fit is no problem at all. I need to now decide if I want an Intel or AMD processor. I hear wonderful things about Intel, but they have 8 core AMD processors for the same price as some Intel quad cores, or cheaper. I was wondering why that is. Are the AMD 8 cores some how less effective than the Intel quad cores?
  • SimonKJones
    SimonKJones Posts: 4,448 Enthusiast
    I've always gone for Intel & Nvidia when it comes to building a machine, I've never touched AMD/ATI, other than when I had my very first computer waaaaay back. I'm not really sure why this is...generally when I've been buying and done research, Intel/Nvidia have had the best deals/power, but that tends to shift back and forth every few years.
    Best thing probably is to check out reviews on Tom's Hardware et al and see what the current trends are.

  • I decided to leave my computer alone as it did everything I needed it to. Now, with the Christmas season fast approaching, I was looking to upgrade my computer from the ground up, starting with my motherboard and cpu.
    My case will house an ATX motherboard, so finding one to fit is no problem at all. I need to now decide if I want an Intel or AMD processor. I hear wonderful things about Intel, but they have 8 core AMD processors for the same price as some Intel quad cores, or cheaper. I was wondering why that is. Are the AMD 8 cores some how less effective than the Intel quad cores?
    Personally, if I was to build a new machine, I would go with an Intel i7, they are a fair bit faster than the current AMD's.
    Intel uses hyper-threading with their chips so the Operating System see's this as "double the amount of cores". Therefore an Intel i7 Quad will appear as an 8 core chip to the system (4 cores / 8 threads). It's not the same as having 8 physical cores but it would seem Intel's chips are more efficient at this time in most tasks.
    That being said, I'm sure the AMD 8 core systems will do the job, just likely not as quickly as the i7's. I use the older AMD 6 core processor and it does the job fine for now.
  • MatthiasClaflin
    MatthiasClaflin Posts: 674 Just Starting Out
    The way I see it, I can spend a little under $500 for an AMD Barebones kit and get an 8 core processor. When I look at Intel's barebones, in order to get an i7 I have to spend at least $735. That is quite a bit of difference. The cheapest i5 barebones kit is a little under $500 but the next one up is over $500. So I don't know which to choose. I am leaning toward AMD as of now simply due to price and the fact that they have more physical cores. Maybe that doesn't matter though. I don't really know. Is there something else I should be looking at other than cores and GHz?
  • SimonKJones
    SimonKJones Posts: 4,448 Enthusiast
    Definitely how many awesome irrelevant LEDs it has to flash so that people can totally admire your l33t case.

  • The way I see it, I can spend a little under $500 for an AMD Barebones kit and get an 8 core processor. When I look at Intel's barebones, in order to get an i7 I have to spend at least $735. That is quite a bit of difference. The cheapest i5 barebones kit is a little under $500 but the next one up is over $500. So I don't know which to choose. I am leaning toward AMD as of now simply due to price and the fact that they have more physical cores. Maybe that doesn't matter though. I don't really know. Is there something else I should be looking at other than cores and GHz?
    I think it just really depends on what you plan on doing with the computer, how long you want it to last and how much power you want.
    For example, if you're building it for games, the i5's have a wicked price/performance ratio.
    If building for something like HitFilm - a better GPU is more important than the state of the art CPU (a good CPU is still important though).
    The greater number of physical cores is better at somethings while faster clocked cores are gonna be better at others....
    The i7 is way ahead in most things compared to the AMD 8 core CPU.

    Definitely how many awesome irrelevant LEDs it has to flash so that people can totally admire your l33t case.
    ^^ awesome lol
  • guitar74
    guitar74 Posts: 506
    I would look up the machine and specs online and see what the motherboard can handle. Most motherboards are built to only handle certain cpus, best to write to the company and etc. I just bought a super laptop with one of the highest graphics card to use HFu2 and HF
  • ESPictures
    ESPictures Posts: 533 Just Starting Out

    The way I see it, I can spend a little under $500 for an AMD Barebones kit and get an 8 core processor. When I look at Intel's barebones, in order to get an i7 I have to spend at least $735. That is quite a bit of difference. The cheapest i5 barebones kit is a little under $500 but the next one up is over $500. So I don't know which to choose. I am leaning toward AMD as of now simply due to price and the fact that they have more physical cores. Maybe that doesn't matter though. I don't really know. Is there something else I should be looking at other than cores and GHz?
    i7s are more expensive for a reason. I have 2 hexacore machines - one Intel i7 and one AMD. The i7 renders more than 2X faster than the AMD. Why? The i7 has 2 processor threads per core. The AMD has 1 thread per core. Essentially, my i7 runs as though it has 12 - 3.8ghz cores.
    Of course, the next question is: Do you really need that much extra processing power?
  • I'm Also running a hex core i7 that I built myself, and it is running @4.3GHz with no problems. With HF though, it still comes down too the GPU, and what Intermediate Codec you use. I'm not quite finished with it yet, I still need to put the window in, so I can put in a whooooole bunch of pretty LED's in it. lol
  • MichaelJames
    MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast
    If you want more power... go with a QX6700 or whatever one was the 2.93 ghz quad core.
    I just build a i7 from the ground up. Why buy a bare bones system? you can track down a lot of parts and just build one. RIght now Mobo and power supply are the biggest things. You can upgrade everything else out easy.
  • MichaelJames
    MichaelJames Posts: 2,034 Enthusiast
    And the Q6700 is a old quad core. i3 or i5 would not be a downgrade. Newer technology.... better performance
  • mamoo
    mamoo Posts: 1

    Hey, i don't have the 300$$ for a 4790k or a new motherboard, so with my little duel core is gonna have to do...

    BUT WAIT

    I CANT DOWNLOAD Hitfilm 3 Express, S3ND HALP

    I think it knows i have a duel core and is like, "lol naw fu m8" and the screen yells at me to check the system specks : /

    Can i get this with my current CPU ?

  • Aladdin4d
    Aladdin4d Posts: 2,481 Enthusiast

    The minimum CPU requirement is at least a first generation Core i processor or AMD equivalent. Older processor architectures probably don't have the necessary instruction set.