Canon lens under £100

Froi
Froi Website User Posts: 966
Hey I went on jessops, and looked at some canon lenses under the £100 price mark, I only found this... http://www.jessops.com/online.store/products/12878/show.html and I would like to know what y'all think about this lens, and if there are any good lenses for filming under £100 that you'd recommend (I am not a pro with lenses, all I know is that different lenses do different things, the lens I have at the moment is the kit one (18-55 wide) and I would like more variety of lenses for different shots, and i'd like to have more knowledge about what types of lenses do what type of shot.)
So if y'all could hel, that'd be awesome, thanks everyone! :D
-Froi

Comments

  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,247 Staff
    That's the only Canon lens that exists for under £100, at least new, and for the money, its a great deal.
    In general, prime lenses (lenses which do not zoom) are preferred for film/video work, because they give a sharper image, they usually allow larger apertures, for shallower DOF, and the focal length isn't ever going to accidentally shift mid-shot while you try to pull focus or something.
    Wide angle lenses (like the 18 end of your kit lens) obviously show more of the scene, and can be good for establishing shots or for shooting in tight interior locations. However, especially with the cheaper models, you are apt to get barrel distortion from them, where vertical lines near any edge of the frame become curved. The more expensive options will have rectilinear conversion, to keep lines straight. With extremem wide angles, you can get a fisheye lens, which is mostly useful only for special situations where you need that effect.
    The 50mm lens is cheap because traditionally, it is considered a 'normal' lens, meaning that what it shows is very similar to the field of view we are used to seeing with our eyes. However, this changes a bit when you are using a crop sensor camera, where a normal lens is more like 30mm. So on crop sensor cameras like yours, a 50mm is actually a bit telephoto, and the framing will be more like an 80mm. So, when you want the framing to feel very normal or realistic, often using a 30mm lens can help.
    Telephoto lenses are useful for limiting the framing to a specific person or object, or for seeing things which are very far away. Longer focal lengths help reduce DOF, so using an 80mm or 100mm lens and framing a close-up will generally result in the background being entirely blurred out, provided you use a large-ish aperture.
    Macro lenses are used to focus on things that are very close to the camera. So if you need to film a bee or something tiny, and fill the frame with it, or you just want an extreme close-up on someone's eye or something, then a Macro lens is what you want. They come in a variety of focal ranges, but are generally not particularly wide angle.
    There's my basic, simplified rundown of lenses in general. In addition, you get what you pay for, and for actual productions, its sometimes a better option to rent quality lenses as you need them than to invest in your own. sites like www.borrowlenses.com and www.lensrentals.com make it very affordable and easy.
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    Wow, we'll thanks for the help, I shall save what you said so I can use it as reference in future, and I am hoping when I start to make serious YouTube videos I can make some money that can go towards camera equipment :D
    (I am saying my Lego vids weren't serious because I didn't take much time animating them, I just used them t test out some VFX (I used fxhome for literally all my Lego vids :D ))
  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,247 Staff
    I should have added, in the mention of Prime lenses, that Zooms also have benefits; since they obviously give you multiple focal lengths. So in that respect, you often get more for you money, and even though they aren't as sharp as primes, any modern lens is going to be reasonably sharp. So, depending on the requirements of your project, you have to balance all the factors to select the right lens.
    Another huge benefit of renting lenses is that you can use several options in real world settings, and actually compare them to see what works best for you, without having to shell out tremendous amounts of money.
  • NullUnit
    NullUnit Website User Posts: 791 Just Starting Out
    I bought a Nikon 50mm 1.8f for my Olympus and I love it. It costs about $120 and is totally worth it.
    Also, good info on the focal length change in regard to putting one on a cropped sensor, Axel.
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    Oh, okay, yeah I went in my attack the other day and found a 28-80mm lens (with red dot on instead if white square) and I am guessing it is a zoom lens, if I recall correctly it says zoom lens on it but I can't remember to clear..
    But how do you tell what type if lens a lens is from a glance (eg... "hey that lens that guy is using is a prime/zoom/wide etc")?
    And do the red/ white marks in the canon lens have any significance?
    Thanks a lot for ya help ;)
  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,247 Staff
    if there are two numbers in the lens name, then it is a zoom. A 28-80mm lens will zoom from 28mm to 80mm. Whereas a single number indicates a fixed focal length, also called a prime lens. So an 80mm lens is prime, that is the only focal length it offers, but since it doesn't require all the moving parts that a zoom lens does, the benefit is better optical properties, resulting in a better image.
    As far as quickly identifying lenses, do you mean when you see the lens on a camera, or when you see the footage that has been shot? Every lens will have its focal length marked on the lens barrel somewhere, as far as identifying the lens from the footage it shot, you can generally identify from the angle of view whether the lens was wide angle or telephoto, but a lot of it just comes with experience.
    The Red and White marks do have significance, in relation to whether your camera has a full frame or crop sensor. Lenses with a white mark are built for crop frame sensors, and thus can't really be used on full-frame cameras without causing difficulties with vignetting the corners of the frame. The ones with red marks are build for full-frame sensors, and can thus be used on any camera without issue, regardless of sensor size. So really, if your camera has a crop sensor, the marks don't matter, but if you have a full frame sensor, like the 5D, then you want to avoid the lenses with white marks.
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    That clears a lot up thanks, so with my canon t3i/600D I don't have to worry about marks as it is a crop sensor camera?
    And thanks because now I know what lenses to ask for on my next trip to jessops, haha, without seeming like a total noob :D
    Well I shall go check out which lenses are best for me as I like perculiar angles along with good still (on tripod) shots focusing on certain object like people... So I have a wide angle that can be used for my interesting angles, and I have a zoom lens that I can use for...?
    And then I shall buy a 50mm 1.8 prime for good, clear, sharp "emotional scenes" (dramatic, and full of dialogue etc) :D
    Thanks for e help :D
  • TGamel
    TGamel Website User Posts: 81

    Hey I went on jessops, and looked at some canon lenses under the £100 price mark, I only found this... http://www.jessops.com/online.store/products/12878/show.html and I would like to know what y'all think about this lens, and if there are any good lenses for filming under £100 that you'd recommend.
    -Froi
    I have this lens, really like it a lot for the DOF and the ability to shoot in low light situations. I know it does not have image stabilization (IS), but that has been no problem when using with my shoulder or fig rig mount. Personally, I think it is a steal, and it has become a workhorse in my arsenal of lenses.
    Todd
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    Oh I don't mind abut the IS, do you have a link to what Stabilizer/mount you have?
  • Maemphn
    Maemphn Website User Posts: 1
    edited April 2012
    check the ef 50mm 1.8
    i dont know the & price but in euro its about 100€ - with its aparture you´ll can have a great bouket for movielooks....also great for portrait - in short: money worth!
    but it has no zoom - calculate a 90° viewing
    with a bit training no IS is needed - because of aparture also good low light conditions

    edit: oh you´re already talking about it- good choice - have fun
  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,247 Staff
    edited April 2012
    For what it is worth, IS in lenses works entirely differently for video and for still images, and the only lens Canon makes where the IS will help with video is the 100mm f/2.8 Macro, and even then, only if you have the latest build of the lens. On any other Canon lens, even if it has IS, you'll get better results by turning it off when shooting video.
    Still image IS is designed to stop the frame from moving at all, whereas video IS is designed to keep the movement of the frame smooth. Two very different tasks, requiring different systems.
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    edited April 2012
    @maemphn haha don't worry, but still good info on the lens, I still haven't heard any arguements against this lens so far so it definatley looks like a best buy to me!
    And I don't think I shall bother much with IS lenses, I shall just get a better Stabilizer than the ine I have at the moment, and then stabilise the footage on post, how ever after stabilisation tests (in post) I have come to realise that when you stabilize it a lot the footage looks very strange as if you are dizzy, as all the objects move in strange ways, if you know what I mean haha,
  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,247 Staff
    Yeah, what you are seeing is most likely the results of rolling shutter, the jello effect. Perhaps the biggest downside of using DSLR's for video is that the rolling shutter makes all the vertical lines in the footage wobble if the camera is moving, and therefore camera moves should be very controlled and slow. Planning on stabilizing in post is the wrong way to approach it though, I think. Plan on shooting stable footage to begin with. Then in case of an emergency, you can try fix it in post, but planning to try fix it in post just creates more unnecessary work, and generally the results won't be as good as if you just shot it stable to begin with.
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    Yeahs, I just did some test of me walking around and adding a Stabilizer in post and I must say I hate the post version. So I shall keep as many as my shots locked down or nice and steady, do you have any recomendations for shoulder it's that are good for general filming and support? I have a Stabilizer (opteka x-grip) mainly for BMXing and skate boarding as it has a good handle for that, but I use it for low shots (filming feet, or filming from out of a car window/buggy to get a smooth look like a dolly).
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    Okay, I have the choice of either getting....
    http://www.jessops.com/online.store/categories/Cameras and Lenses/Lenses/products/Canon/EF 50mm f1.8 MK2-12878/Show.html?cm_mmc=GoogleBase-_-Lenses-_-all-_-all&ovc=
    Or
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Professional-Shoulder-Support-Mount-Camcorder/dp/B007FMXK3A/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1335385187&sr=8-13
    I don't know which is more important, I have some lenses, but they are both zoom and therefore are not as clear and crisp as prime lenses, but I do need a good mount/ Stabilizer! And also the stabiliser is good as I can attach an eye piec to the flip out LCD of my t3i then look thorugh the eye piece whilst having a stable image (something I can't do with my current stabilzer, the opteka x-grip)
    So which would you rather get if you had the choice between the two considering these are the lenses you already have:
    Kit lens
    And
    28-80mm zoom with same f/ stop as kit lens (3.5-5.5 I believe the kit one has)
    Thanks y'all
  • TGamel
    TGamel Website User Posts: 81

    Oh I don't mind abut the IS, do you have a link to what Stabilizer/mount you have?
    I made my own Fig Rig design from PVC for a few bucks after looking at the picture of a commercial rig. However, the guys at Indy Mogul have a good tutorial on how to make one that is amazingly close to mine. My rig is a bit smaller, and I created an attachment so that I could mount a cheap tripod head to the rig rather than use the screw mount that they made.
    Anyway, here is a link for their tutorial: Indy Mogul's Fig Rig Stabilizer
    Todd
Sign In or Register to comment.

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!