3D light and NO shadow

moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116
Well, I 've just watched the tutorial 3D lights in hitfilm and while watching I did the same things step by step with my clip to be sure to do the right things, put the subject and layer in 3D added a light, type point, cast shadow and I Have no shadow nowhere....So Could someone tell me why ^please or have a solution ??? I absolutely need to create a shadow on the floor for all the parts of my clip and now I can't work....I really don't understand why I have no shadow even though I did the same as the tutorial....Do I have to change the position of the layer or of the subject??And how???
thank you for help cause I can't work on my project and it's urgent....
have a nice day

Comments

  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116
    Wow, visibly, no one has the solution or explanation to this mystery... or no one read me....ok so no shadow on my clip..Gonna do without, no choice cause I can't work..
    have all a nice day
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Actually, you posted your original question on the weekend, and I'm not even an hour into work on the first day of the new week, so there's hasn't been much of a chance to respond yet. Patience, my friend. :)
    Its tricky to troubleshoot what is set up incorrectly without seeing the project. In addition to each of the involved layers having specific settings that must be set up correctly for the shadow to work, the relative positions of each layer in 3D space are also important, so the shadow is cast in the direction you want it to be. In this case, I'd recommend submitting a support question and attaching the HitFilm project, so we can take a look.
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116
    I know Axel that the position of layers is important, I tried in perspective to push the background to create a space with the subject but it just changes the scale... smaller or bigger but not the position..Don't know how to push the layer...Sure it would solve the problem
    Blessed Easter to you and yours!
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    There are separate controls for changing the Scale and the Position, both in the Controls Panel and on the Viewer widget. Keep in mind that changing the position along the Z axis will make the layer appear to change size, even though the scale hasn't changed, simply due to perspective. Things look smaller as they move farther away. This video should help explain the Transform controls better:
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116
    [quote name='Axel Wilkinson' timestamp='1333724946' post='15697']
    There are separate controls for changing the Scale and the Position, both in the Controls Panel and on the Viewer widget. Keep in mind that changing the position along the Z axis will make the layer appear to change size, even though the scale hasn't changed, simply due to perspective. Things look smaller as they move farther away. This video should help explain the Transform controls better:

    [/quote
    Thank you Axel, I managed to create a shadow by moving the background, but now my shadow is behind me on the wall and don't know how to put it on the floor cause on the floor the shadow must be in the other side, i mean the subject is facing to the camera, so the shadow must be on the floor but to be natural in front of the subject, the shadow must be reverse, the head upside down, I tried to move the light but it moves only from left to right....Can you tell me how to do to put the shadow on the floor and in the opposite side??so what I mean is the foot of the shadow gotta be stuck to the subject's foot....Thanks again!!
    Nice Easter to you
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Provided the floor is 3D, the layer with the subject is 3D, and the two layers are properly aligned, so that there is no space between his feet and the floor, then the shadow will automatically be aligned correctly, because its a real shadow. Put the shadow above your subject and just behind it on the Z axis, and the shadow will be cast toward the camera. The farther behind the subject the light is, the longer the shadow will be. I'm guessing that there must be space between your subject and the floor, if the shadow isn't connected to the foot. Which is how shadows work. If you were floating above the floor, there would be space between you and your shadow. So, make sure that the Y position of the bottom of your subject and that of the floor match, so there is no space between them.
    Take the Y dimensions of your subject layer, in pixels, and divide it in half. So, if your layer is 1080 video, half of that would be 540.
    Now, check the Y position of the layer, which marks its centerpoint, and subtract the number we just calculated. If your layer was still in the default 0 position, then you would come up with a value of -540.
    Whatever value you have here, based on your layer's position, this is the Y position that should be assigned to the floor plane, so that it lines up with the bottom of the video layer.
    Now, most likely your subject's feet don't exactly line up with the bottom of the video frame (unless your subject layer has been comped, to embed the alpha), so you will need to bring the floor plane up along the Z axis until it touches the bottom of the feet. If you already have the shadow set up, then you can just adjust it upward until the shadow touches the feet.
    Lights are 3D layers, they have to be, and can therefore be moved in any possible direction at any time. They move along the X axis (left and right), the Y axis (up and down), and the Z axis (forward and backward).
    Keep in mind that the steps for creating a perfect version of this same shadow while filming are as follows:
    Set up a spot light above your subject.
    Turn the switch on.
    Hopefully this demonstrates the point that shadows should always be created on set when possible, as they are easier, faster, require very little equipment, and will invariably look better.
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116

    Provided the floor is 3D, the layer with the subject is 3D, and the two layers are properly aligned, so that there is no space between his feet and the floor, then the shadow will automatically be aligned correctly, because its a real shadow. Put the shadow above your subject and just behind it on the Z axis, and the shadow will be cast toward the camera. The farther behind the subject the light is, the longer the shadow will be. I'm guessing that there must be space between your subject and the floor, if the shadow isn't connected to the foot. Which is how shadows work. If you were floating above the floor, there would be space between you and your shadow. So, make sure that the Y position of the bottom of your subject and that of the floor match, so there is no space between them.
    Take the Y dimensions of your subject layer, in pixels, and divide it in half. So, if your layer is 1080 video, half of that would be 540.
    Now, check the Y position of the layer, which marks its centerpoint, and subtract the number we just calculated. If your layer was still in the default 0 position, then you would come up with a value of -540.
    Whatever value you have here, based on your layer's position, this is the Y position that should be assigned to the floor plane, so that it lines up with the bottom of the video layer.
    Now, most likely your subject's feet don't exactly line up with the bottom of the video frame (unless your subject layer has been comped, to embed the alpha), so you will need to bring the floor plane up along the Z axis until it touches the bottom of the feet. If you already have the shadow set up, then you can just adjust it upward until the shadow touches the feet.
    Lights are 3D layers, they have to be, and can therefore be moved in any possible direction at any time. They move along the X axis (left and right), the Y axis (up and down), and the Z axis (forward and backward).
    Keep in mind that the steps for creating a perfect version of this same shadow while filming are as follows:
    Set up a spot light above your subject.
    Turn the switch on.
    Hopefully this demonstrates the point that shadows should always be created on set when possible, as they are easier, faster, require very little equipment, and will invariably look better.
    Ok Axel,well what I did, I pushed the background backward to create a space with the subject cause I didn't have a shadow, by pushing the background I had a shadow, so I was glad!!I also used the point type, so that's true that the feet floating above the floor cause I pushed the background to have a shadow...If I don't do that I have no shadow at all...Was I right to push the background Axel??? I put the background and the subject in 3D, So when you tell to adjust the floor plane to the feet, do you mean the background or a new plane for the floor?? cause I didn't create a floor plane... Thank you for taking time to explain, you are very kind...
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    For the shot that you are working with, you'll want a floor plane, in addition to the background. The shadow is meant to be below the subject, on the floor, and the background plane isn't under him, so you need to create a floor plane to receive the shadow, in order for the shadow to end up in the right place. Make the floor plane white, then once you have the shadow set up, you can set its blend mode to Multiply, and the plane will disappear, leaving just the shadow.
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116
    Axel, I did what you say,I created a plane in 3d renamed "floor" and I added with blend mode, but the shadow stays behind the subject and not below on the floor..So don't understand why, I selected cast shadows and receive shadow..As I said I have to push the background cause if I don't push it I have no shadow at all, so I have no choice but normally the shadow should be on the floor plane...So maybe I did something wrong?? I also put the background in 3D and selected cast shadows, so can you tell me if I have to link the plane to the shadow by doing something?? Cause despite the plane for the floor the shadow is still standing...I become crazy lol
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Within the 3D space of hitfilm, the subject has to be between the light and the floor, in order for a shadow to be cast there. Its all in setting up the position of the layers so that the shadow gets cast in the right direction, which will chiefly be a matter of adjusting the position of your light.
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116

    Within the 3D space of hitfilm, the subject has to be between the light and the floor, in order for a shadow to be cast there. Its all in setting up the position of the layers so that the shadow gets cast in the right direction, which will chiefly be a matter of adjusting the position of your light.
    Axel, I wanna tell you that I created a shadow!!!!!! lol Yeah! ok it's not perfect,but I have my shadow on the floor, I explain, I created a "floor" and added with blend mode but there is a color difference with the background, I tried with overlay and multiply as you said, but the plan stays darker than the background...so we see a dark rectangle around the shadow not black or white but darker....how to correct it??
    thanks again Axel
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,242 Staff
    Cool, good to hear you are making progress. Most likely the reason the plane is still sort of visible is that the light is not illuminating it evenly, and therefore its not entirely white anymore. Try increasing the Range of the light, so it illuminates the plane more evenly.
  • moonwalkermoonwalker Website User Posts: 116

    Cool, good to hear you are making progress. Most likely the reason the plane is still sort of visible is that the light is not illuminating it evenly, and therefore its not entirely white anymore. Try increasing the Range of the light, so it illuminates the plane more evenly.
    Thanks Axel, It works too!!! I try to do my best you know, fortunately you are there...
    have an nice We
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