Which lens is the best all round lens for DSLR ?

Marty
Marty Website User Posts: 11
Which lens is the best all round lens for DSLR like the Canon 600D. I mean for getting the cinematic look. Budget is around 200 $

Comments

  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966
    I use an ef-s wide angle 18-55 mm it's good, but Im not sure if it will be ooba cinematic
  • budwzr
    budwzr Website User Posts: 655
    edited March 2012

    I use an ef-s wide angle 18-55 mm it's good, but Im not sure if it will be ooba cinematic
    You probably already noticed there's not much zoom in that lens. Also, the f-stop is not low enough to film in low light.
    For low light filming you'll need the 50mm prime (nifty fifty), around $100. A great deal. Also, the 50mm will give you extreme sharpness and DOF in your lego productions.
  • budwzr
    budwzr Website User Posts: 655
    edited March 2012

    Which lens is the best all round lens for DSLR like the Canon 600D. I mean for getting the cinematic look. Budget is around 200 $
    Oh, sorry, I put your reply to Froi.
    The best lens for $200 is the Canon 18-135mm IS. You've GOT to have IS, don't buy a cheaper lens without it or you'll be forced to use a tripod ALL THE TIME, or else shoot at high shutter speeds all the time, and that's no good.
    IS is Image Stabilization.
    Auto Focus doesn't matter. Eventually, you give up on it and use manual focus as your skills progress, and you get tired of taking fuzzy pictures. The 600D only has a nine point autofocus, and sometimes it's difficult to obtain a lock, or to know if that lock is even on what you're focusing on.
    I have unique way of focusing the 600D, but that's beyond the scope of this thread.
    P.S. The cinematic look is done in post, but you can get part way there using the color settings in the menu, like vivid, neutral, faithful,etc. Myself, I shoot neutral.
  • Marty
    Marty Website User Posts: 11
    Is it possible to have a prime lens with IS on my budget. I will be shooting alot of indoor scenes and need low f-stop for that right? So the 50mm Canon 1.8 is without IS or could it be a good 100$ choice?
  • AxelWilkinson
    AxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,249 Staff
    There's not really any such thing as a 'best all around lens,' unfortunately. The whole reason there are different lenses is because each one is good for different things. I have an 18-270 zoom that I use a lot as an all-around lens for stills, but its not that great for video, and to get that kind of zoom with even remotely fast glass is very expensive. The only Canon lens with IS that really works for video is the 100mm Macro, the IS system in all of their older lenses won't help with video, although its still quite nice for stills. For your budget, the $100 Canon 50mm f1/8 which Budwzr mentioned is easily the best value and performance option.
    A cinematic look is much more dependent on your lighting, your framing, and your production values than it is on your lens. Although prime lenses will ALWAYS be sharper than zoom lenses, and generally have lower apertures available, which means shallower depth of field.
  • Aculag
    Aculag Website User Posts: 708 Just Starting Out
    edited March 2012
    That's a great lens, Marty, but if you want something general purpose to start with, you're probably not going to want a prime lens, especially for indoor scenes. 50mm translates to something like 70-80mm because of the size of the chip in the camera, so a wider angle lens (lower number=wider angle) would be much better suited to indoor shooting.
    The lens Budwzr mentioned (18-135) is super versatile and you could use it for just about anything. I personally don't think IS is necessary, but it is a really nice addition if your hands are shaky.
  • budwzr
    budwzr Website User Posts: 655
    edited March 2012
    I personally don't think IS is necessary, but it is a really nice addition if your hands are shaky.
    Or if you get caught without a tripod and want to take a full telephoto shot at 200 ISO and less than 1/500 shutter. Your f-stop is going up to 5 at that point, remember. :)
  • Aculag
    Aculag Website User Posts: 708 Just Starting Out
    edited March 2012
    Good thing most people don't shoot telephoto indoors. But yeah.
  • budwzr
    budwzr Website User Posts: 655
    edited March 2012
    Hey, indoors is even tougher because of the low light. Them babies jerk and twitch around too, hahaha.
    BTW, does anyone reading this use an LCD Viewfinder? Or a variable density filter?
    Because I think both are important too. I use the ND filter to shoot in strong sun. And the LCD Viewfinder lets you shoot live mode in the daylight, where you normally can't see anything in the LCD.
    Now that you're able to use live mode in any sunlight, you can use the 5x magnifier (blue plus sign) and razor focus manually, then just squeeze off the shot.
    Your focus will be 100% precise from that point on. And you'll never go back to the eyepiece and the nine points that don't work well except in ideal conditions.
    The way I do it is I frame the shot AFTER manually focusing, that way I lock my DOF at the same time.
  • SimonKJones
    SimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,448 Enthusiast
    Bear in mind that IS will also suck up your battery rapidly if you're shooting video. IS is fine for photography, because it only uses it very briefly while the photo is being taken. If you use IS for video, it's operating the entire time you're recording.
    It can definitely give a stabilisation benefit, but be careful of battery consumption.
    The cheap 50mm f1/8 is indeed awesome. It's a bit cheap feeling in its construction, but for the price the quality of the visuals are great.
  • Marty
    Marty Website User Posts: 11
    ok, thanks for all your great advice. Im going to spend a lot of money tomorrow :D
    Buying: Canon 600D with 18-55mm standart lens + Canon 50mm 1,8.
    accessories: 2 uv filters and 2 lenshoods, a 16gb memorycard(fast) and a bag for it all :P
    I cant wait to go try it.
    thanks again
  • Froi
    Froi Website User Posts: 966

    You probably already noticed there's not much zoom in that lens. Also, the f-stop is not low enough to film in low light.
    For low light filming you'll need the 50mm prime (nifty fifty), around $100. A great deal. Also, the 50mm will give you extreme sharpness and DOF in your lego productions.
    Yeah it's rubbish zoom lol, but I don't really need much for my stuff, and I don't use it for Lego, I gunna start doing proper videos now (proper, as in containing people) lol