2D Depth of Field

Hey guys!
I would like to know if their is a way to accomplish 2D depth of field in HitFilm Ultimate. I am messing around and I can't really find a way to do so. Also, is the DoF effect standard on most cameras?

Comments

  • SaiTurtlesninjaNXSaiTurtlesninjaNX Website User Posts: 76
    Depth of field is common in most DSRL and professional grade camcorder but not some much in the consumer level cameras.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    Depth of field is what happens when you use a large aperture and fast shutter while filming. Its a side effect of the settings used to capture the scene, and not a specific feature of a camera. I assume what you are after is shallow depth of field, where the subject is in focus, and the resto f the scene is blurred out? Because you can also have great depth of field, where everything is in focus, and that should be pretty easy to achieve with any camcorder, in most cases.
    Can you explain what you mean by 2D depth of field? Do you want to blur parts of your footage while leaving other parts sharp? If so, you'll need to isolate the parts you want to blur, using masks or something, so you can blur them without affecting the rest of the footage. Do you have a stack of 2D layers and want to blur the ones in the back?
  • NuttyBananaNuttyBanana Website User Posts: 151
    I assume he means that he want's to add DoF to his shots in post. I don't think there's a straight forward/quick/easy way to do this and off the top of my head I'd suggest duplicating the layer however many times required and masking the different levels on each layer and then blur each one accordingly.
    If you're using a lower end camera then there is a slight cheat for achieving some DoF by zooming the camera in and then move back/forward to get focused on the target. I'd only suggest this for still shots only though.
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    edited March 2012
    If you're using a lower end camera then there is a slight cheat for achieving some DoF by zooming the camera in and then move back/forward to get focused on the target. I'd only suggest this for still shots only though.
    I don't understand how this is a cheat; that's how you create shallow depth of field. Large aperture, and as long a focal length as you can get. Its true of any camera.
  • NuttyBananaNuttyBanana Website User Posts: 151
    Maybe I chose the wrong wording, but I was responding to SaiTurtlesninjaNX's comment about using professional or DSLR cameras, where I then suggested zooming rather than picking up and pricey camera.
  • budwzrbudwzr Website User Posts: 655
    Color me stupid, but I don't understand what zooming has to do with creating DOF. And what do you mean by "zooming"?
    Changing focal length? Or crop zooming like a phone cam?
  • AxelWilkinsonAxelWilkinson Staff Administrator, Imerge Beta Tester, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 5,241 Staff
    Yeah, changing the focal length. The longer the focal length, the shallower the DOF will be. Cropping won't have any effect on depth of field. In general, on lower-end cameras, the aperture doesn't open wide enough at the wide open end of things to get very shallow depth of field, but when zoomed in its easier to achieve.
    Zoom in as far as your camera will go, then frame a medium close-up on someone, and if there is any distance between them and the background, you should see some blur going on behind them. You have to have a lot of space to get far enough away from the subject to make this work, which means for a lot of interior stuff its not really an option, but with a lot of affordable cameras its the only way to get shallow depth of field.
  • budwzrbudwzr Website User Posts: 655
    I guess I never tried that. When I was using cheap cameras, I didn't even know what DOF was. :)
  • SimonKJonesSimonKJones Moderator Website User, HitFilm Beta Tester Posts: 4,450 Enthusiast
    It's all to do with basic optics. Corridor Digital actually did a really nice mini tutorial on this a while back:
  • CableCaptainCableCaptain Website User Posts: 2
    edited March 2012
    Ok guys, I was going for shallow DoF. As NuttyBanana said, I was trying to see if it could be accomplished in post-production. I am experimenting with masking as Axel said I should, and thanks Simon! That really helped!
    Thanks guys for your quick response!
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